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Cabbage in Cluj

Cabbage in Cluj


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Finely chop the cabbage, rub with salt and put in a pot with a little oil (I use sunflower oil) together with half a cup of water, 1 teaspoon of thyme, covered over low heat, from time to time mix more and if necessary add water.

Separately prepare the minced meat together with the finely chopped onion, crushed garlic, salt, a tablespoon of pepper, a tablespoon of paprika, when the meat is ready add the tomato paste. If the meat is not greasy, add a little water.

Boil a cup of rice and drain the water.

When the cabbage is hardened, mix everything (cabbage, meat and rice) lightly, put it in a covered oven, for about 40 minutes at 200 degrees.

Take it out, let it rest for a while and serve it with bread and possibly sour cream.

Good appetite!


Szekler cabbage named "a la Cluj"

For gourmets, Cluj cabbage is a treat for the senses. Bring together the cabbage, sweet or pickled, and the fat of the pork, temper the rice, but overcook the cream. In short, a real caloric bomb that, on top of that, has nothing to do with Cluj. Apart from the name.

Cabbage from Cluj is actually a Szekler food, first written about at the end of the 17th century. It is attributed to the Franciscan monks from Șumuleu Ciuc, where at that time was the largest Catholic institution in Transylvania, and many consider it a variant of hardened cabbage, although there are rumors that it is actually unrolled cabbage rolls.

The recipe was printed in 1695 in Miklos Misztotfalus's Cluj Cookbook, which caught on very well with the public, as evidenced by the frequent republishings in the following years.

If we follow the recipe, it should be cooked only with pork and lard, while nowadays the product has been seasoned with oil and beef. Otherwise, even now, as then, the taste of Transylvania comes from smoking: smoked ham or kaiser and smoked sausages.

But pay close attention to sauerkraut as well. Don't be fooled when you buy it from the market. Cabbage should be pickled, not chemically soured, with lemon salt, colored and soaked in scalded water. And don't forget the other tastes of Transylvania. Paprika (or our traditional paprika) cannot be missing from the story, just as thyme should not be omitted. Optionally you can also use cumin, but it depends entirely on the pleasure of each. As with hardened cabbage, the more intense the taste, the fresher the thyme and dill.

Then. everything comes naturally, as can be seen below:

Grease the bowl with lard, place a layer of finely chopped cabbage, meat and rice, plus sausages and ham. Depending on how salty the cabbage is, add salt or not. At the end, put a layer of cream. Either before entering the oven or directly in the plate. Or best before and when served. And don't worry too much, in 30 minutes, in a preheated oven and put on high heat, the Cluj cabbage is ready. With fresh bread or polenta. A! Keep the hot peppers and wine, because they fit perfectly.

Life as a Franciscan monk, what more! No worries about calories, no cholesterol! Hallelujah!

Did you like it? Share:

Paul Dan

Why are we looking for something delicious when it comes to food? It's not fair to answer a question, but why should we eat? We are in 2019 and for hundreds of years we have not eaten just to live. We eat to please our senses - the eye to admire what is on the plate, the nose to smell the smell, the taste buds to be ecstatic with the taste, and, as a summum, the brain to bring us that full satisfaction of the meal.

I found in Pipera's corporate canteens, and not only, that many, accustomed to matches and cheefs and many French fries, do not know (or know, but do not care) that a roasted chicken in a cauldron of roses and bone, well bathed in mujdei, it is much tastier and healthier than an industrially prepared one. What's better than a grilled carp compared to some fishfingers or squid rounds?

For all those who either do not know the true taste of Romanian products, or want to diversify and, why not, try new ideas, I will present here the secrets of Romanian cuisine.


Szekler cabbage named "a la Cluj"

For gourmets, Cluj cabbage is a treat for the senses. Bring together the cabbage, sweet or pickled, and the fat of the pork, temper the rice, but overcook the cream. In short, a real caloric bomb that, on top of that, has nothing to do with Cluj. Apart from the name.

Cabbage from Cluj is actually a Szekler food, first written about at the end of the 17th century. It is attributed to the Franciscan monks from Șumuleu Ciuc, where at that time was the largest Catholic institution in Transylvania, and many consider it a variant of hardened cabbage, although there are rumors that it is actually unrolled cabbage rolls.

The recipe was printed in 1695 in Miklos Misztotfalus's Cluj Cookbook, which caught on very well with the public, as evidenced by the frequent republishing in the following years.

If we follow the recipe, it should be cooked only with pork and lard, while nowadays the product has been seasoned with oil and beef. Otherwise, even now, as then, the taste of Transylvania comes from smoking: smoked ham or kaiser and smoked sausages.

But pay close attention to sauerkraut as well. Don't be fooled when you buy it from the market. Cabbage should be pickled, not chemically soured, with lemon salt, colored and soaked in scalded water. And don't forget the other tastes of Transylvania. Paprika (or our traditional paprika) cannot be missing from the story, just as thyme should not be omitted. Optionally you can also use cumin, but it depends entirely on the pleasure of each. As with hardened cabbage, the more intense the taste, the fresher the thyme and dill.

Then. everything comes naturally, as can be seen below:

Grease the bowl with lard, place a layer of finely chopped cabbage, meat and rice, plus sausages and ham. Depending on how salty the cabbage is, add salt or not. At the end, put a layer of cream. Either before entering the oven or directly in the plate. Or best before and when served. And don't worry too much, in 30 minutes, in a preheated oven and put on high heat, the Cluj cabbage is ready. With fresh bread or polenta. A! Keep the hot peppers and wine, because they fit perfectly.

Life as a Franciscan monk, what more! No worries about calories, no cholesterol! Hallelujah!

Did you like it? Share:

Paul Dan

Why are we looking for something delicious when it comes to food? It's not fair to answer a question, but why should we eat? We are in 2019 and for hundreds of years we have not eaten just to live. We eat to please the senses - the eye to admire what is on the plate, the nose to smell the smell, the taste buds to be ecstatic with the taste, and, as a summum, the brain to bring us that full satisfaction of the meal.

I found in Pipera's corporate canteens, and not only, that many, accustomed to matches and cheefs and many French fries, do not know (or know, but do not care) that a roasted chicken in a cauldron of roses and bone, well bathed in mujdei, it is much tastier and healthier than an industrially prepared one. What's better than a grilled carp compared to some fishfingers or squid rounds?

For all those who either do not know the true taste of Romanian products, or want to diversify and, why not, try new ideas, I will present here the secrets of Romanian cuisine.


Szekler cabbage named "a la Cluj"

For gourmets, Cluj cabbage is a treat for the senses. Bring together the cabbage, sweet or pickled, and the fat of the pork, temper the rice, but overcook the cream. In short, a real caloric bomb that, on top of that, has nothing to do with Cluj. Apart from the name.

Cabbage from Cluj is actually a Szekler food, first written about at the end of the 17th century. It is attributed to the Franciscan monks from Șumuleu Ciuc, where at that time was the largest Catholic institution in Transylvania, and many consider it a variant of hardened cabbage, although there are rumors that it is actually unrolled cabbage rolls.

The recipe was printed in 1695 in Miklos Misztotfalus's Cluj Cookbook, which caught on very well with the public, as evidenced by the frequent republishing in the following years.

If we follow the recipe, it should be cooked only with pork and lard, while nowadays the product has been seasoned with oil and beef. Otherwise, even now, as then, the taste of Transylvania comes from smoking: smoked ham or kaiser and smoked sausages.

But pay close attention to sauerkraut as well. Don't be fooled when you buy it from the market. Cabbage should be pickled, not chemically soured, with lemon salt, colored and soaked in scalded water. And don't forget the other tastes of Transylvania. Paprika (or our traditional paprika) cannot be missing from the story, just as thyme should not be omitted. Optionally you can also use cumin, but it depends entirely on the pleasure of each. As with hardened cabbage, the more intense the taste, the fresher the thyme and dill.

Then. everything comes naturally, as can be seen below:

Grease the bowl with lard, place a layer of finely chopped cabbage, meat and rice, plus sausages and ham. Depending on how salty the cabbage is, add salt or not. At the end, put a layer of cream. Either before entering the oven or directly in the plate. Or best before and when served. And don't worry too much, in 30 minutes, in a preheated oven and put on high heat, the Cluj cabbage is ready. With fresh bread or polenta. A! Keep the hot peppers and wine, because they fit perfectly.

Life as a Franciscan monk, what more! No worries about calories, no cholesterol! Hallelujah!

Did you like it? Share:

Paul Dan

Why are we looking for something delicious when it comes to food? It's not fair to answer a question, but why should we eat? We are in 2019 and for hundreds of years we have not eaten just to live. We eat to please the senses - the eye to admire what is on the plate, the nose to smell the smell, the taste buds to be ecstatic with the taste, and, as a summum, the brain to bring us that full satisfaction of the meal.

I found in Pipera's corporate canteens, and not only, that many, accustomed to matches and cheefs and many French fries, do not know (or know, but do not care) that a roasted chicken in a cauldron of roses and bone, well bathed in mujdei, it is much tastier and healthier than an industrially prepared one. What's better than a grilled carp compared to some fishfingers or squid rounds?

For all those who either do not know the true taste of Romanian products, or want to diversify and, why not, try new ideas, I will present here the secrets of Romanian cuisine.


Cluj cabbage with mushrooms - a vegetarian interpretation of the classic recipe

  • Cabbage in Cluj with mushrooms (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Cabbage in Cluj with mushrooms
  • The main ingredients (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) The main ingredients
  • Cabbage preparation (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Cabbage preparation
  • When the onion becomes slightly glassy, ​​add the carrots, celery, then the chopped mushrooms (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) When the onion becomes slightly glassy, ​​add the carrots, celery, then the chopped mushrooms
  • Add 150 ml of broth, salt and pepper, dill and chopped thyme. At the end add the boiled rice (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Add 150 ml of broth, salt and pepper, dill and chopped thyme. At the end add the boiled rice
  • Mix everything well until the composition is homogeneous. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Mix everything well until the composition is homogeneous.
  • The assembly follows in layers, alternating one layer of cabbage and one of filling. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Layer assembly follows, alternating one layer of cabbage and one layer of filling.
  • At the end, cover with the remaining cabbage. Place tomato slices on top, over which olive oil is poured into a thin thread. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Finally cover with remaining cabbage. Place tomato slices on top, over which olive oil is poured into a thin thread.
  • Keep in the oven for 30-40 minutes or until nicely browned on the surface. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Bake for 30-40 minutes or until nicely browned on the surface.

The sweet and sour combination of mushrooms and sauerkraut pleasantly stimulates the taste buds. Thyme, dill and pepper give the food an extra flavor, which is hard to resist.

Ingredient:

a pickled or sweet cabbage (preferably pickled),
2 tablespoons oil,
salt and pepper to taste,
a bunch of thyme, dill,

for the mushroom filling:
2 tablespoons oil,
2 onions or a leek,
2 carrots,
a piece of celery,
500 g mushrooms,
half a teaspoon of paprika,
1 cup round grain rice 1 1/2 cups boiling water,

a jar of tomatoes in broth (250 ml tomato sauce),
150 ml cream (optional),
salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

The sauerkraut is rinsed well in several waters, and if it is too salty, it is left to desalt in cold water for a few hours. Remove the thick ribs from the base of the outer leaves, then cut the cabbage in half and chop into strips as for a salad.

In a saucepan, put two tablespoons of oil, then add the cabbage. Stir, stirring constantly so that it does not stick. After boiling, add up to a cup of hot water. Leave it on the fire until the water drops and the cabbage softens. At the end, add pepper and thyme, then set aside.

Boil the rice separately in a pot, to which a cup and a half of hot water and a pinch of salt have been added. Boil for about 10 minutes, then set aside. The rice will absorb all the water.

To prepare the mushroom filling, prepare the vegetables first. Peel and chop the onion or leek. Carrots are cleaned and grated on a large grater. Celery is cleaned and put on a small grater. Finely chop the mushrooms with a kitchen towel, finely chop.

In a larger saucepan, put 2 tablespoons of oil, then add onions or leeks, stirring occasionally. When the onion becomes slightly glassy, ​​add the carrots, celery and half a teaspoon of paprika. Stir a few times then reduce the heat, and simmer for 4-5 minutes.

Then add the chopped mushrooms and cook for a few more minutes, until the mushrooms start to leave water.

Add 150 ml of broth, salt and pepper, dill and chopped thyme. At the end, add the boiled rice and mix well until the composition is homogeneous.

The assembly follows in layers, alternating one layer of cabbage and one of filling. Pour a little oil into a heat-resistant dish, enough to grease the dish well on the inside, then add a layer of cabbage, then spread a layer of mushrooms, followed by another layer of cabbage and mushrooms again. At the end, cover with the remaining cabbage. Place tomato slices on top, over which olive oil is poured into a thin thread.

Sprinkle with thyme and dill then place the tray in the preheated oven at 180 C. Keep in the oven for 30-40 minutes or until nicely browned on the surface. Serve hot with sour cream, hot peppers and polenta.


Szekler cabbage named "a la Cluj"

For gourmets, Cluj cabbage is a treat for the senses. Bring together the cabbage, sweet or pickled, and the fat of the pork, temper the rice, but overcook the cream. In short, a real caloric bomb that, on top of that, has nothing to do with Cluj. Apart from the name.

Cabbage from Cluj is actually a Szekler dish, first written in the late 17th century. It is attributed to the Franciscan monks of Șumuleu Ciuc, where at that time was the largest Catholic institution in Transylvania, and many consider it a variant of hardened cabbage, although there are rumors that it is actually unrolled cabbage rolls.

The recipe was printed in 1695 in Miklos Misztotfalus's Cluj Cookbook, which caught on very well with the public, as evidenced by the frequent republishings in the following years.

If we follow the recipe, it should be cooked only with pork and lard, while nowadays the product has been seasoned with oil and beef. Otherwise, even now, as then, the taste of Transylvania comes from smoking: smoked ham or kaiser and smoked sausages.

But pay close attention to sauerkraut as well. Don't be fooled when you buy it from the market. Cabbage should be pickled, not chemically soured, with lemon salt, colored and soaked in scalded water. And don't forget the other tastes of Transylvania. Paprika (or our traditional paprika) cannot be missing from the story, just as thyme should not be omitted. Optionally you can also use cumin, but it depends entirely on the pleasure of each. As with hardened cabbage, the more intense the taste, the fresher the thyme and dill.

Then. it all comes naturally, as can be seen below:

Grease the bowl with lard, place a layer of finely chopped cabbage, meat and rice, plus sausages and ham. Depending on how salty the cabbage is, add salt or not. At the end, put a layer of cream. Either before entering the oven or directly in the plate. Or best before and when served. And don't worry too much, in 30 minutes, in a preheated oven and put on high heat, the Cluj cabbage is ready. With fresh bread or polenta. A! Keep the hot peppers and wine, because they fit perfectly.

Life as a Franciscan monk, what more! No worries about calories, no cholesterol! Hallelujah!

Did you like it? Share:

Paul Dan

Why are we looking for something delicious when it comes to food? It's not fair to answer a question, but why should we eat? We are in 2019 and for hundreds of years we have not eaten just to live. We eat to please the senses - the eye to admire what is on the plate, the nose to smell the smell, the taste buds to be ecstatic with the taste, and, as a summum, the brain to bring us that full satisfaction of the meal.

I found in Pipera's corporate canteens, and not only, that many, accustomed to matches and cheefs and many french fries, do not know (or know, but do not care) that a roasted chicken in a cauldron of roses and bone, well bathed in mujdei, it is much tastier and healthier than an industrially prepared one. What's better than a grilled carp compared to some fishfingers or squid rounds?

For all those who either do not know the true taste of Romanian products, or want to diversify and, why not, try new ideas, I will present here the secrets of Romanian cuisine.


Szekler cabbage named "a la Cluj"

For gourmets, Cluj cabbage is a treat for the senses. Bring together the cabbage, sweet or pickled, and the fat of the pork, temper the rice, but overcook the cream. In short, a real caloric bomb that, on top of that, has nothing to do with Cluj. Apart from the name.

Cabbage from Cluj is actually a Szekler dish, first written in the late 17th century. It is attributed to the Franciscan monks of Șumuleu Ciuc, where at that time was the largest Catholic institution in Transylvania, and many consider it a variant of hardened cabbage, although there are rumors that it is actually unrolled cabbage rolls.

The recipe was printed in 1695 in Miklos Misztotfalus's Cluj Cookbook, which caught on very well with the public, as evidenced by the frequent republishing in the following years.

If we follow the recipe, it should be cooked only with pork and lard, while nowadays the product has been seasoned with oil and beef. Otherwise, even now, as then, the taste of Transylvania comes from smoking: smoked ham or kaiser and smoked sausages.

But pay close attention to sauerkraut as well. Don't be fooled when you buy it from the market. Cabbage should be pickled, not chemically soured, with lemon salt, colored and soaked in scalded water. And don't forget the other tastes of Transylvania. Paprika (or our traditional paprika) cannot be missing from the story, just as thyme should not be omitted. Optionally you can also use cumin, but it depends entirely on the pleasure of each. As with hardened cabbage, the more intense the taste, the fresher the thyme and dill.

Then. everything comes naturally, as can be seen below:

Grease the bowl with lard, place a layer of finely chopped cabbage, meat and rice, plus sausages and ham. Depending on how salty the cabbage is, add salt or not. At the end, put a layer of cream. Either before entering the oven or directly in the plate. Or best before and when served. And don't worry too much, in 30 minutes, in a preheated oven and put on high heat, the Cluj cabbage is ready. With fresh bread or polenta. A! Keep the hot peppers and wine, because they fit perfectly.

Life as a Franciscan monk, what more! No worries about calories, no cholesterol! Hallelujah!

Did you like it? Share:

Paul Dan

Why are we looking for something delicious when it comes to food? It's not fair to answer a question, but why should we eat? We are in 2019 and for hundreds of years we have not eaten just to live. We eat to please our senses - the eye to admire what is on the plate, the nose to smell the smell, the taste buds to be ecstatic with the taste, and, as a summum, the brain to bring us that full satisfaction of the meal.

I found in Pipera's corporate canteens, and not only, that many, accustomed to matches and cheefs and many french fries, do not know (or know, but do not care) that a roasted chicken in a cauldron of roses and bone, well bathed in mujdei, it is much tastier and healthier than an industrially prepared one. What's better than a grilled carp compared to some fishfingers or squid rounds?

For all those who either do not know the true taste of Romanian products, or want to diversify and, why not, try new ideas, I will present here the secrets of Romanian cuisine.


Cluj cabbage with mushrooms - a vegetarian interpretation of the classic recipe

  • Cabbage in Cluj with mushrooms (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Cabbage in Cluj with mushrooms
  • The main ingredients (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) The main ingredients
  • Cabbage preparation (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Cabbage preparation
  • When the onion becomes slightly glassy, ​​add the carrots, celery, then the chopped mushrooms (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) When the onion becomes slightly glassy, ​​add the carrots, celery, then the chopped mushrooms
  • Add 150 ml of broth, salt and pepper, dill and chopped thyme. At the end add the boiled rice (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Add 150 ml of broth, salt and pepper, dill and chopped thyme. At the end add the boiled rice
  • Mix everything well until the composition is homogeneous. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Mix everything well until the composition is homogeneous.
  • The assembly follows in layers, alternating one layer of cabbage and one of filling. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Layer assembly follows, alternating a layer of cabbage and a layer of filling.
  • At the end, cover with the remaining cabbage. Place tomato slices on top, over which olive oil is poured into a thin thread. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Finally cover with remaining cabbage. Place tomato slices on top, over which olive oil is poured into a thin thread.
  • Keep in the oven for 30-40 minutes or until nicely browned on the surface. (Maria Matyiku / Epoch Times) Bake for 30-40 minutes or until nicely browned on the surface.

The sweet and sour combination of mushrooms and sauerkraut pleasantly stimulates the taste buds. Thyme, dill and pepper give the food an extra flavor, which is hard to resist.

Ingredient:

a pickled or sweet cabbage (preferably pickled),
2 tablespoons oil,
salt and pepper to taste,
a bunch of thyme, dill,

for the mushroom filling:
2 tablespoons oil,
2 onions or a leek,
2 carrots,
a piece of celery,
500 g mushrooms,
half a teaspoon of paprika,
1 cup round grain rice 1 1/2 cups boiling water,

a jar of tomatoes in broth (250 ml tomato sauce),
150 ml cream (optional),
salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

Rinse the sauerkraut well in several waters, and if it is too salty, leave it to soak for a few hours in cold water. Remove the thick ribs from the base of the outer leaves, then cut the cabbage in half and chop into strips as for a salad.

In a saucepan, put two tablespoons of oil, then add the cabbage. Stir, stirring constantly so as not to get caught. After boiling, add up to a cup of hot water. Leave it on the fire until the water drops and the cabbage softens. At the end add pepper and thyme, then set aside.

Boil the rice separately in a pot, to which a cup and a half of hot water and a pinch of salt have been added. Boil for about 10 minutes, then set aside. The rice will absorb all the water.

To prepare the mushroom filling, prepare the vegetables first. Peel and chop the onion or leek. Carrots are cleaned and grated on a large grater. Celery is cleaned and put on a small grater. Finely chop the mushrooms with a kitchen towel, finely chop.

In a larger saucepan, put 2 tablespoons of oil, then add onions or leeks, stirring occasionally. When the onion becomes slightly glassy, ​​add the carrots, celery and half a teaspoon of paprika. Stir a few times then reduce the heat, and simmer for 4-5 minutes.

Then add the chopped mushrooms and continue to cook for a few minutes, until the mushrooms begin to leave water.

Add 150 ml of broth, salt and pepper, dill and chopped thyme. At the end, add the boiled rice and mix well until the composition is homogeneous.

The assembly follows in layers, alternating one layer of cabbage and one of filling. Pour a little oil into a heat-resistant dish, enough to grease the dish well on the inside, then add a layer of cabbage, then spread a layer of mushrooms, followed by another layer of cabbage and mushrooms again. At the end, cover with the remaining cabbage. Place tomato slices on top, over which olive oil is poured into a thin thread.

Sprinkle with thyme and dill then place the tray in the preheated oven at 180 C. Keep in the oven for 30-40 minutes or until nicely browned on the surface. Serve hot with sour cream, hot peppers and polenta.


Szekler cabbage named "a la Cluj"

For gourmets, Cluj cabbage is a treat for the senses. Bring together the cabbage, sweet or pickled, and the fat of the pork, temper the rice, but overcook the cream. In short, a real caloric bomb that, on top of that, has nothing to do with Cluj. Apart from the name.

Cabbage in Cluj is actually a Szekler food, first written about at the end of the 17th century. It is attributed to the Franciscan monks from Șumuleu Ciuc, where at that time was the largest Catholic institution in Transylvania, and many consider it a variant of hardened cabbage, although there are rumors that it is actually unrolled cabbage rolls.

The recipe was printed in 1695 in Miklos Misztotfalus's Cluj Cookbook, which caught on very well with the public, as evidenced by the frequent republishings in the following years.

If we follow the recipe, it should be cooked only with pork and lard, while nowadays the product has been seasoned with oil and beef. Otherwise, even now, as then, the taste of Transylvania comes from smoking: smoked ham or kaiser and smoked sausages.

But pay close attention to sauerkraut as well. Don't be fooled when you buy it from the market. Cabbage should be pickled, not chemically soured, with lemon salt, colored and soaked in scalded water. And don't forget the other tastes of Transylvania. Paprika (or our traditional paprika) cannot be missing from the story, just as thyme should not be omitted. Optionally you can also use cumin, but it depends entirely on the pleasure of each. As with hardened cabbage, the more intense the taste, the fresher the thyme and dill.

Then. it all comes naturally, as can be seen below:

Grease the bowl with lard, place a layer of finely chopped cabbage, meat and rice, plus sausages and ham. Depending on how salty the cabbage is, add salt or not. At the end, put a layer of cream. Either before entering the oven or directly in the plate. Or best before and when served. Și nu vă faceți griji multe, în 30 de minute, într-un cuptor preîncălzit și dat la foc mare, varza a la Cluj e gata. Cu pâine proaspătă sau cu mămăliguță. A! Păziți ardeii iuți și vinul, pentru că se potrivesc de minune.

Viață de călugăr franciscan, ce mai! Fără grija caloriilor, fără să țină cont de colesterol! Aleluia!

Ți-a plăcut? Dă mai departe:

Paul Dan

De ce căutăm ceva delicios când vine vorba de mâncare? Nu este corect să răspund tot cu o întrebare, dar, de ce trebuie să mâncăm? Suntem în 2019 și de sute de ani nu ne mai hrănim doar ca să trăim. Mâncăm ca să ne bucurăm simțurile – ochiul să admire ceea ce e în farfurie, nasul să adulmece mirosul, papilele să fie extaziate de gust, iar, ca un summum, creierul să ne aducă acea satisfacție deplină a mesei.

Am constatat în cantinele corporatiste ale Piperei, și nu numai, că mulți, obișnuiți cu mecuri și cheefsiuri și muuulți cartofi prăjiți, nu știu (sau știu, dar nu le pasă) că un pui rumenit la ceaun de-i rozi și osul, bine scăldat în mujdei, e mult mai gustos și mai sănătos decât unul pregătit industrial. Cu ce-i mai prejos un crap fript pe grătar comparativ cu niște fishfingers sau rondele de calamar?

Pentru toți cei care fie că nu cunosc adevăratul gust al produselor românești, fie că vor să-și diversifice și, de ce nu, să încerce noi idei, voi prezenta aici din secretele bucătăriei românești.


Varza secuiască botezată „a la Cluj”

Pentru gurmanzi, varza a la Cluj este un răsfăț al simțurilor. Aduce laolaltă varza, dulce sau murată murată, și grăsimea cărnii de porc, mai temperează orezul, dar supralicitează smântâna. Pe scurt, o adevărată bombă calorică ce, culmea, nu are nicio legătură cu Clujul. În afară de denumire.

Varza a la Cluj este de fapt o mâncare secuiască, despre care s-a scris prima dată la finele secolului 17. Este atribuită călugărilor franciscani de la Șumuleu Ciuc, acolo unde la acea vreme se găsea cea mai mare instituție catolică din Transilvania, și mulți o consideră o variantă de varză călită, deși sunt voci care spun că ar fi de fapt sarmale nerulate.

Rețeta a fost tipărită la 1695 în Cartea de bucate de la Cluj a lui Miklos Misztotfalus, ce a prins foarte bine la public, dovadă fiind desele republicări în anii ce au urmat.

Dacă am respecta rețeta, ar trebui gătită doar cu carne de porc și untură, în vreme ce în zilele noastre produsul a mai fost temperat cu ulei și carne de vită. În rest, și acum, ca și atunci, gustul Ardealului vine din afumătură: șuncă afumată sau kaiser și cârnații afumați.

Însă mare atenție și la varza murată. Nu vă lăsați păcăliți când o cumpărați de la piață. Varza trebuie să fie murată, nu acrită chimic, cu sare de lămâie, colorată și înmuiată de apa opărită. Și nu uitați și de celelalte gusturi ale Transilvaniei. Paprika (sau boiaua noastră tradițională) nu are cum să lipsească din poveste, așa cum nici cimbrul nu trebuie omis. Opțional puteți folosi și chimen, dar depinde cu totul de plăcerea fiecăruia. Ca și la varza călită, cu atât mai intens este gustul cu cât cimbrul și mărarul sunt mai proaspete.

Apoi. totul vine de la sine, după cum se poate observa mai jos:

Se unge vasul cu untură, se așază un strat de varză tocată mărunt, carnea și orezul, plus cârnați și șunca. În funcție de cât de sărată e varza, se mai pune sau nu sare. La final se pune un strat de smântână. Fie înainte de a intra la cuptor, fie direct în farfurie. Sau cel mai bine și înainte și când se servește. Și nu vă faceți griji multe, în 30 de minute, într-un cuptor preîncălzit și dat la foc mare, varza a la Cluj e gata. Cu pâine proaspătă sau cu mămăliguță. A! Păziți ardeii iuți și vinul, pentru că se potrivesc de minune.

Viață de călugăr franciscan, ce mai! Fără grija caloriilor, fără să țină cont de colesterol! Aleluia!

Ți-a plăcut? Dă mai departe:

Paul Dan

De ce căutăm ceva delicios când vine vorba de mâncare? Nu este corect să răspund tot cu o întrebare, dar, de ce trebuie să mâncăm? Suntem în 2019 și de sute de ani nu ne mai hrănim doar ca să trăim. Mâncăm ca să ne bucurăm simțurile – ochiul să admire ceea ce e în farfurie, nasul să adulmece mirosul, papilele să fie extaziate de gust, iar, ca un summum, creierul să ne aducă acea satisfacție deplină a mesei.

Am constatat în cantinele corporatiste ale Piperei, și nu numai, că mulți, obișnuiți cu mecuri și cheefsiuri și muuulți cartofi prăjiți, nu știu (sau știu, dar nu le pasă) că un pui rumenit la ceaun de-i rozi și osul, bine scăldat în mujdei, e mult mai gustos și mai sănătos decât unul pregătit industrial. Cu ce-i mai prejos un crap fript pe grătar comparativ cu niște fishfingers sau rondele de calamar?

Pentru toți cei care fie că nu cunosc adevăratul gust al produselor românești, fie că vor să-și diversifice și, de ce nu, să încerce noi idei, voi prezenta aici din secretele bucătăriei românești.


Varza secuiască botezată „a la Cluj”

Pentru gurmanzi, varza a la Cluj este un răsfăț al simțurilor. Aduce laolaltă varza, dulce sau murată murată, și grăsimea cărnii de porc, mai temperează orezul, dar supralicitează smântâna. Pe scurt, o adevărată bombă calorică ce, culmea, nu are nicio legătură cu Clujul. În afară de denumire.

Varza a la Cluj este de fapt o mâncare secuiască, despre care s-a scris prima dată la finele secolului 17. Este atribuită călugărilor franciscani de la Șumuleu Ciuc, acolo unde la acea vreme se găsea cea mai mare instituție catolică din Transilvania, și mulți o consideră o variantă de varză călită, deși sunt voci care spun că ar fi de fapt sarmale nerulate.

Rețeta a fost tipărită la 1695 în Cartea de bucate de la Cluj a lui Miklos Misztotfalus, ce a prins foarte bine la public, dovadă fiind desele republicări în anii ce au urmat.

Dacă am respecta rețeta, ar trebui gătită doar cu carne de porc și untură, în vreme ce în zilele noastre produsul a mai fost temperat cu ulei și carne de vită. În rest, și acum, ca și atunci, gustul Ardealului vine din afumătură: șuncă afumată sau kaiser și cârnații afumați.

Însă mare atenție și la varza murată. Nu vă lăsați păcăliți când o cumpărați de la piață. Varza trebuie să fie murată, nu acrită chimic, cu sare de lămâie, colorată și înmuiată de apa opărită. Și nu uitați și de celelalte gusturi ale Transilvaniei. Paprika (sau boiaua noastră tradițională) nu are cum să lipsească din poveste, așa cum nici cimbrul nu trebuie omis. Opțional puteți folosi și chimen, dar depinde cu totul de plăcerea fiecăruia. Ca și la varza călită, cu atât mai intens este gustul cu cât cimbrul și mărarul sunt mai proaspete.

Apoi. totul vine de la sine, după cum se poate observa mai jos:

Se unge vasul cu untură, se așază un strat de varză tocată mărunt, carnea și orezul, plus cârnați și șunca. În funcție de cât de sărată e varza, se mai pune sau nu sare. La final se pune un strat de smântână. Fie înainte de a intra la cuptor, fie direct în farfurie. Sau cel mai bine și înainte și când se servește. Și nu vă faceți griji multe, în 30 de minute, într-un cuptor preîncălzit și dat la foc mare, varza a la Cluj e gata. Cu pâine proaspătă sau cu mămăliguță. A! Păziți ardeii iuți și vinul, pentru că se potrivesc de minune.

Viață de călugăr franciscan, ce mai! Fără grija caloriilor, fără să țină cont de colesterol! Aleluia!

Ți-a plăcut? Dă mai departe:

Paul Dan

De ce căutăm ceva delicios când vine vorba de mâncare? Nu este corect să răspund tot cu o întrebare, dar, de ce trebuie să mâncăm? Suntem în 2019 și de sute de ani nu ne mai hrănim doar ca să trăim. Mâncăm ca să ne bucurăm simțurile – ochiul să admire ceea ce e în farfurie, nasul să adulmece mirosul, papilele să fie extaziate de gust, iar, ca un summum, creierul să ne aducă acea satisfacție deplină a mesei.

Am constatat în cantinele corporatiste ale Piperei, și nu numai, că mulți, obișnuiți cu mecuri și cheefsiuri și muuulți cartofi prăjiți, nu știu (sau știu, dar nu le pasă) că un pui rumenit la ceaun de-i rozi și osul, bine scăldat în mujdei, e mult mai gustos și mai sănătos decât unul pregătit industrial. Cu ce-i mai prejos un crap fript pe grătar comparativ cu niște fishfingers sau rondele de calamar?

Pentru toți cei care fie că nu cunosc adevăratul gust al produselor românești, fie că vor să-și diversifice și, de ce nu, să încerce noi idei, voi prezenta aici din secretele bucătăriei românești.


Video: : Όποιος νοσεί έχει πιο πολλά αντισώματα από τον εμβολιασμένο


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