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Whoopi Goldberg Blogs about her Vaporizer for The Cannabist

Whoopi Goldberg Blogs about her Vaporizer for The Cannabist


Actress Whoopi Goldberg starts her tenure as a contributor for 'The Cannabist' by writing about her vaporizer pen

"I named her Sippy because I take tiny, little sips — sassy sips, even — from her."

In her debut column for The Cannabist, a Colorado-based marijuana enthusiasts’ portal, actress–comedienne Whoopi Goldberg penned a love letter to her vape pen.

First of all, you’re probably asking, Whoopi, what’s a vape pen?

A vape pen, or vaporizer pen, is a pen-sized device that “vaporizes the active ingredients of plant material, commonly cannabis or tobacco.” So there you have it.

Anyway, why is Whoopi Goldberg writing for The Cannabist? Besides “extolling the virtues” of her vaporizer pen, Goldberg hopes to draw even more attention to the states that have officially legalized medical marijuana, and how it the substance changed her life.

The full blog post, which you should read, details how Goldberg, who suffers from glaucoma and glaucoma-related headaches, experienced life differently after her daughter gifted her with “Sippy.”

“I took a sip,” she writes. “It was beautiful. And my pen and I have been together ever since.”

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Denver Post hires Whoopi Goldberg to write for marijuana blog

The Denver Post, the Colorado newspaper that has closely chronicled the legalisation of recreational cannabis in its home state, on Thursday unveiled the actor and TV star Whoopi Goldberg as a celebrity contributor to its marijuana blog.

In her inaugural post on The Cannabist website, Goldberg wrote a paean to the vaporiser that allows her to inhale marijuana easily.

The vape pen has changed my life. No, I’m not exaggerating. In fact, her name is Sippy. Yes, she’s a she. And yes, I named her Sippy because I take tiny, little sips – sassy sips, even – from her. And with each sip comes relief – from pressure, pain, stress, discomfort.

Goldberg, who lives in New Jersey, reveals that she uses cannabis to provide relief from the searing headaches that come with glaucoma, rather than for a recreational high. The recreational use of marijuana in Colorado was approved by a November 2012 ballot measure. A law enacting the ballot initiative came into force on 1 January 2014.


Whoopi Goldberg Writes Ode To 'Sippy,' The Vape Pen That Delivers Her THC Fix

How much does Whoopi Goldberg love her weed-filled vape pen? So much so that she penned a column on it today for The Denver Post's marijuana blog, The Cannabist. It's titled, "Whoopi Goldberg: My vape pen and I, a love story."

The View co-host will be writing a column for The Cannabist once every two months. In her first column, she writes about how her vape pen has helped her deal with glaucoma-induced headaches that "come on like freight trains." No longer does she need to take a fistful of Advil or never leave her bedroom because of edibles. She now has her vape pen that she's endearingly named "Sippy" because of the "sassy sips" she takes from from "her"—yes, it's a she.

"The high is different, too," Goldberg writes, like a love story. "It feels like a gentle, warm breeze at the beach. It’s like someone undoing a vise grip, very slowly. It’s not overpowering—and I’m certainly not looking for that high high. I’m looking for relief."

Although she makes the post funny and light by writing a love letter to her vape pen, she also makes a serious argument about legalizing marijuana use. She suggests her friends going through chemotherapy to use weed and a vape pen to be discreet.


Well, these days, one of Goldberg’s many passions is talking about her beloved vape pen, which she uses to treat her chronic glaucoma.

Vape pens, or vaporizers, look and function much like an electronic cigarette except that they allow the user to insert their own dried herbs or oil or wax concentrates. Through a slow heating process, the device produces clean vapor full of cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids—without the toxic irritants of smoking.

Goldberg writes in The Cannabist that she was skeptical when her daughter showed her a vaporizer for the first time, recalling that it looked entirely too complicated to use. But trying the vape pen was all she needed to get hooked.

“I took a sip. It was beautiful. And my pen and I have been together ever since,” Goldberg writes. “The vape pen has changed my life. No, I’m not exaggerating. In fact, her name is Sippy. Yes, she’s a she. And yes, I named her Sippy because I take tiny, little sips — sassy sips, even — from her. And with each sip comes relief — from pressure, pain, stress, discomfort.”

Now, after experiencing the benefits of ingesting cannabis through vape pens for herself, Goldberg is telling her story in the hopes that others might find relief through this powerful technique.


Whoopi Goldberg Pens Column for the Cannabist

Whoopi Goldberg loves her vape pen and wants everyone to know it.

A new column by "The View" co-host debuted Thursday on the Cannabist, the Denver Post's cannabis-focused news website covering legalized recreational marijuana in Colorado.

"My vape pen and I maintain a mostly private relationship. Sure, I’ll sometimes show my pen to a friend or share her with a close confidant," Goldberg, 58, writes in her premiere column. "But mostly it’s just she and I working through my pain. And her ability to help me live comfortably with glaucoma makes her one of the more important figures in my day to day."

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Goldberg’s debut column focuses on using marijuana to find relief from glaucoma-induced headaches that she says "come on like freight trains."

"What kind of kush is in my vape pen at the moment?" she continues. "The indica-dominant Platinum OG, of course."

"The high is different, too. It feels like a gentle, warm breeze at the beach. It’s like someone undoing a vice grip, very slowly. It’s not overpowering — and I’m certainly not looking for that high high. I’m looking for relief."

Goldberg will write a column about every two months, Post owner Digital First Media announced in a press release. The idea for the article was developed after Ricardo Baca, Editor of the Cannabist, appeared on "The View."

Baca says he and Goldberg "instantly connected" when he appeared on the daytime chat fest. "Whoopi's column provides a direct and personal perspective on marijuana use in this modern era," Baca said. "We're grateful that she is willing to add her voice to this conversation."


Whoopi Goldberg’s In Love With A Pot Pen

Looking ahead to April 20– the unofficial holiday of all things marijuana — actor and talk show host Whoopi Goldberg shifted into journalism to write a column for The Cannabist in celebration of her marijuana vaporizer pen.

Goldberg said her daughter gave her the pen to dispense the drug Goldberg uses to deal with the pain of glaucoma. Goldberg said she loves it so much, she’s named it “Sippy.”

“The vape pen has changed my life. No, I’m not exaggerating,” Goldberg wrote.

But she didn’t stop there, penning at length about her love for her pot pen, according to a story on The Grio.

“I love my Sippy, it’s true,” she wrote.

Goldberg’s outspoken liberal views has made her one of the more popular hosts on “The View,” the daytime talk show she co-hosts with several others including producer Barbara Walters. Goldberg’s new venture as a bloggers expands into a new arena for the multi-faceted star who has won an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony in her diverse career.

The Cannabist is a blog on the Denver Post website. Colorado is one of two states – along with Washington – that legalized marijuana use, a topic Goldberg visited on her first blog post.

“As I write my debut column for The Cannabist, talking about this newly legal weed and admiring the states that have had the foresight to legalize medical marijuana, I’m most tempted to extol the virtues of the vape pen,” Goldberg wrote.

Goldberg said she trying smoking joints but didn’t enjoy it. The high changed once she tried the pen, she said.

“I took a sip. It was beautiful. And my pen and I have been together ever since,” she wrote. Later she continued, “The high is different, too. It feels like a gentle, warm breeze at the beach.”

Goldberg is a resident of New Jersey, which has limited legal marijuana laws for medicinal purposes.


Why Whoopi Didn&rsquot Treat Her Migraine Attacks

What took so long for her to seek professional care? Like about half of the 40 million people in the US with migraine, Whoopi avoided seeing a doctor for her painful migraine attacks until recently. &ldquoI think about it as being on fire. When your entire body [is] on fire like that, there&rsquos not a lot of funny.&rdquo

Long before she starred in The Color Purple, hosted The Academy Awards or The View, Whoopi Goldberg (born Caryn Elaine Johnson), grew up in a poor New York City neighborhood. Her mother worked several jobs, including as a nurse and a teacher. Her father abandoned the family. She reportedly dropped out of high school and became addicted to drugs ( 1 ).

&ldquoI started getting migraines when I was a younger woman and didn&rsquot go to doctors for it,&rdquo remembers Whoopi. &ldquoIf one came on or I thought my head was getting ready to explode, I would get in the closet, and just close it and go to sleep, and hope that nobody opened the door, or spoke to me. And it was years before I got to an actual real doctor.&rdquo

Whoopi&rsquos reasons for avoiding a doctor mirror our own: a constellation of ingrained beliefs, feeling misunderstood, skepticism, and hopelessness from too many failed treatments.

&ldquoYou Need to Take This Seriously&rdquo

Too often, people who have never experienced a migraine attack don&rsquot understand. Friends, family, strangers, and bosses often dismiss the debilitating attacks as a bad headache, which it most certainly is not. Migraine is a genetic neurological disease with a variety of symptoms.

Whoopi recalls trying to describe her pain to others: &ldquo&lsquoMy head is killing me,&rsquo and people go, &lsquoOh, okay. Well, all right.&rsquo And you just stop telling people. You stop saying what you really want to say, which is, &lsquoYou need to take this seriously. This hurts! This is not a joke.&rsquo&rdquo

That rejection can be as emotionally painful as the physical pain of the attack. Naturally, Whoopi was tempted to unleash a funny comeback. &ldquoI knew that even if I joked about it, I&rsquod get in trouble, because they didn&rsquot have a sense of humor.&rdquo

In time, people begin to internalize the trivialization of the disease as shame, even blaming themselves and avoiding encounters &ndash even at the doctor&rsquos office &ndash where they might face hurtful disbelief again.

The Pressure to &ldquoPlow Through&rdquo

We&rsquove watched Whoopi Goldberg&rsquos blunt, comedic talent unfold in the &rsquo80s on Broadway, in films like Ghost and Sister Act, and on benefit shows like Comic Relief. Imagine her hosting the Oscars and Tony Award Shows with bright lights she couldn&rsquot dim and a raging migraine attack. &ldquoI would get them in the middle of working, and have to plow through,&rdquo she recalled.

Migraine stigma at work is a big problem many of us can understand. When you&rsquore craving a dark, cool room and you&rsquore under contract to perform in front of 60 million people around the world, that&rsquos pressure. Like every schoolteacher, nurse, truck driver, and retail clerk trying to plow through a shift, that responsibility to finish the job you&rsquove promised to do for your employer instead of succumbing to a migraine attack takes its toll.

&ldquoAll I wanted to [do was] rip my clothes off, take all these earrings out of my ear. I just wanted to take everything off and just lay on the floor like this.&rdquo Whoopi tucks her head down and rolls her body in tight, like an armadillo.

Admitting you&rsquore dealing with repeated migraine attacks forces a tough conversation with employers that many people aren&rsquot ready to have. People sometimes avoid seeking medical care out of fear that their employer will find out through claims processed by employer-paid insurance. While this violates health privacy laws in most companies, it&rsquos still a deterrent to some people seeking care.

Like her character Celie in &ldquoThe Color Purple,&rdquo Whoopi describes a younger life of great suffering before finally finding a way to joy and happiness. Image: Getty

Failure and Frustration

For decades, the quality of migraine treatments available was sub-par, experts say. Until the introduction of triptans like Imitrex in 1995, most physicians had few effective medications to offer their patients aside from creative combinations of other off-label drugs. And even triptans are only taken by about 15% of people with migraine, often with unpleasant side effects.

For people like Whoopi who first visited the doctor more than 20 years ago, they may have experienced a series of treatment failures that discouraged them from seeking medical care for migraine at all.

Whoopi Goldberg&rsquos migraine was first diagnosed by a doctor when she was a young woman. He told her, &ldquoThere&rsquos not a lot we can do,&rdquo leaving her to feel defeated.

Like most of us who have a cabinet full of things that failed to bring relief, she says she had pretty much given up hope. &ldquoI tried a lot of over-the-counter stuff &hellip and things that grew in my yard, and none of it, none of it, none of it, none of it worked. Nothing. And I just assumed that this was going to be my life.&rdquo

Natural Selection

The former drug addict made no secret of her continued use of marijuana for recreation and pain relief. Her reference to &ldquothings that grew in my yard&rdquo wasn&rsquot explained any further. Her cannabis company, Whoopi & Maya, went up in smoke in 2020 after four years of marketing CBD products. While the company didn&rsquot offer any migraine products, they did market CBD to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps and endometriosis, from which Whoopi says she&rsquos suffered.

In a 2014 editorial in The Cannabist, Whoopi said she used her vape pen for glaucoma and headaches that &ldquocame on like a freight train ( 2 ).&rdquo

Is there any real evidence for cannabis relieving migraine? Experts say no, except for relieving some of the symptoms, triggers, and comorbidities like nausea, anxiety and insomnia.


Whoopi Goldberg is not the only weed-friendly celeb

Whoopi and Maya is only the latest in a long line of celebrity-endorsed marijuana products. Rapper Snoop Dog has one of the most beautifully branded product lines ever created. It’s called Leafs by Snoop and includes concentrates, edibles, and eight strains of weed handpicked by the Doggfather himself. Even Miley Cyrus of The Voice and Hannah Montana fame sponsored a line of 24-karat gold wrapping papers manufactured by the Shine company during her 2014 Bangerz concert.


What You Need To Know About Whoopi Goldberg's Cannabis Ventures

Whoopi Goldberg has always been a fan of cannabis, since her youth, when she would use it to relieve her menstrual cramps.

Fast forward to 2020, and Goldberg&rsquos interest in cannabis has translated to a female-run business. The medical cannabis company Whoopi and Maya launched four years ago.

While other Hollywood celebrities like Snoop Dogg, Seth Rogen or Mike Tyson have presented the public with medical cannabis products of their own, the award-winning actress&rsquo take on the substance is inherently female-centric, making her stand out in an ever-expanding market.

The cannabis company &mdash which she founded in April 2016 together with Maya Elisabeth, creator ofOM Edibles creator and winner of multiple Cannabis Cups, &mdash offers a wide variety of carefully crafted products for relief of common women&rsquos health issues like menstrual and muscle cramps, inflammation and stress.

Although many state legislatures still don&rsquot consider dysmenorrhea, or menstrual cramps, to be a real medical condition that warrants access to medical marijuana, the global female population likely disagrees. And with nobody else on the market targeting this issue, Whoopi and Maya made it their tagline. But make no mistakes: Goldberg and Elisabeth offer a lot more to the market, and it&rsquos not just for women.

Men Are Part Of The Game Too

While creating a conversation around women&rsquos health and thetaboo-for-some subject of menstruation may have been the initial impulse for founding their cannabis firm, Goldberg and Elisabethhave expanded far beyond that scope today. There&rsquos no doubt that men suffer from pain, stress and anxiety too, so why should their products target one gender

Relax, for example, a cannabis-infused tincture with ingredients like elderberry and motherwort, acts as an anxiety and stress reliever regardless of gender.

TheCBD body balm Rub goes even further by providing strong relief for chronic ailments like arthritis, inflammation and headaches, in addition to helping treat bruises and muscle cramps.

The cannabis-infused raw cacao Savor is not only vegan, but makes for the perfect sugar-free edible to anyone looking to boost their antioxidants and &ldquofeel good vibes.&rdquo

Different State, Different Package

While the initial launch of Whoopi and Maya was successful in California, the brand has had to navigate the tricky state-by-state regulatory landscape just like all cannabis companies.

Their jump to the Colorado market was especially delicate, as Goldberg told Forbes: &ldquoafter we launched, we started learning what worked and what didn&rsquot and still have to continuously re-adjust course as regulations change, and we learn more.&rdquo

What she&rsquos referring to is the difference in ingredient alignment, as well as packaging guidelines controlled by the state of Colorado. So if you&rsquore a Cali native and searching for your favorite Whoopi and Maya product in Denver, some confusion might arise.

Products like the aforementioned Savor are usually sold in a small glass jar in California, but this is a no-go in Colorado, where the law requires products to be stamped with a diamond-shaped THC label.

Since this wasn&rsquot possible, they brand redesigned their packaging, and you can now find the raw cacao in single-serving foil pouches with 10 mg of THC each.

These women know how to make it work, regardless of regulatory challenges, so be sure to expect further expansion from them in the years to come. Breaking through to the East Coast markets of New York and New Jersey seems to be high up on the priority list, as the validityof dysmenorrhea as an illness is still under discussion among legislators.

About Benzinga Events: The Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference series is held throughout the year in North American cities. Each event brings investors face-to-face with top cannabis companies to hear about advancements in the rapidly evolving sector. Benzinga's Cannabis Capital Conference returns to Miami on February 24-25, 2020.


Whoopi Goldberg Blogs about her Vaporizer for The Cannabist - Recipes

M y vape pen and I maintain a mostly private relationship. Sure, I’ll sometimes show my pen to a friend or share her with a close confidant. But mostly it’s just us working through my pain. And her ability to help me live comfortably with glaucoma makes her one of the more important figures in my day to day.

When I show her to a friend, the reaction 99 percent of the time is: “Holy shit, where did you get this and how can I get me one?” They’re seriously that blown away by my vape pen. And they should be. She’s that amazing.

As I write my debut column for The Cannabist, talking about this newly legal weed and admiring the states that have had the foresight to legalize medical marijuana, I’m most tempted to extol the virtues of the vape pen. I didn’t anticipate this first column to be such a love story, some sort of semi-romantic comedy. But it works, and it’s true, and so here we go.

The vape pen has changed my life. No, I’m not exaggerating. In fact, her name is Sippy. Yes, she’s a she. And yes, I named her Sippy because I take tiny, little sips — sassy sips, even — from her. And with each sip comes relief — from pressure, pain, stress, discomfort. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Maybe two years ago, once I stopped smoking cigarettes, I really tried to smoke a joint. I had to “really try” because I was having a hard time with it. Suddenly I had virginal lungs, and I was feeling quite annoyed about it all.

“I think I have something you might like,” my daughter said after I told her about my difficulty with the joint. Four days later, she showed up and brought me this giant thing in a box. It had a big tube and a sturdy base and it was fairly large, and as soon as I saw it I knew I couldn’t do whatever it required of me.

“It’s a vaporizer,” my daughter told me. But I knew it was too much. She said, “Here, you can slowly inhale as much as you want. And it’s vapor, not smoke.” When she was with me on the East Coast, I knew I could work that desktop vaporizer. But as soon as she left it was too complicated.

Seven weeks later my daughter was saying it again: “I think I have something you might like.” She was coming back, and I said, “No way.” She said, “Just take a sip.” And that’s what I did.

I took a sip. It was beautiful. And my pen and I have been together ever since.

I love my Sippy, it’s true. And now there are so many different kinds of vape pens — some with coils, some you have to clean out, some you don’t have to clean. I like the simple pens with cartridges of THC oil because, if you’re not a smoker or you can’t inhale deeply, it’s a wonderful way of ingesting cannabis.

What kind of kush is in my vape pen at the moment? The indica-dominant Platinum OG, of course.

These pens are light, compact and portable. The vapor is inoffensive and subtle. And for me a lot of the new pot is too strong — and when I take edibles I rarely come out of the room. With the vape pen, you have more control over how much THC you ingest. If my headache is just starting, I know a short sip will take care of it. If the pressure inside my head is pounding, then two or three sips is a better prescription.

These glaucoma-induced headaches come on like freight trains — like, BOOM, my head starts hurting, my eyes start bugging, my whole body starts to tense up. But then I find her, and it relaxes everything and calms everything. It helps my head stop hurting, and with glaucoma your eyes ache, and she takes the ache out. It’s wonderful.

The high is different, too. It feels like a gentle, warm breeze at the beach. It’s like someone undoing a vise grip, very slowly. It’s not overpowering — and I’m certainly not looking for that high high. I’m looking for relief.

I used to take Advil by the handful for this very reason, and I don’t take Advil anymore — not for my eye. You’re not supposed to eat Advil every day, and I was eating them every day, these man-made things. But I can do this without hurting myself. It helps that I know when to do it. I have a day job where I need to be clear. But if I need it after the show, she’s there. And if I don’t feel any pain, she stays in my purse.

I take Sippy everywhere I go. And I’m respectful when I’m in a city that may not understand what I have, so I don’t flaunt her. She plugs into my computer to charge. She stays charged for a long time. She’s easy and discreet to use, and for folks like myself who use marijuana medicinally, it’s ideal for a number of reasons. In fact, I’ve recommended her to a lot of folks I know who are going through chemo.

And when those friends try my Sippy for the first time and ask me where they can get one for themselves, I tell them, “It’s not legal here. But if you’re going west, this is what you want.” And some of them do go west where they pick up a Sippy of their own. And for this I couldn’t be happier, because it‘s important for people to know that there are alternatives out there to manage pain, and this one is particularly magical.


Watch the video: Whoopi Goldberg Speaks On Cannabis - Full Interview