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Pigs foot souse recipe

Pigs foot souse recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Pork

I enjoy making and eating souse. I loved the souse she made, and since I have worked out my own recipe and method.

61 people made this

IngredientsServes: 10

  • 2 whole pigs trotters (feet) cleaned
  • 5 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 large sweet onion (nice if it's a red one)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 Scotch bonnet peppers (I like it HOT!!) (if they're red ones it adds to the colour)
  • 4 medium limes
  • 2 large cucumbers

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:1hr ›Extra time:12hr pickling › Ready in:13hr15min

  1. Using a large pan, or preferably a pressure cooker, cover the trotters in water and bring to the boil and simmer for 2 to 3 minutes.
  2. Drain off all the water and replace with fresh cold water to cover the trotters along with the bay leaves, half the black peppercorns and the coriander seeds.
  3. Bring to the boil and pressure cook at a low pressure for 50 minutes. (Pigs feet tend to smell a little strange when being boiled but I have found the addition of bay, black pepper and coriander seed improves the aroma greatly.)
  4. While the trotters are cooking add to a large glass bowl the onion very finely sliced. Sliced is better than chopped here because it becomes part of the texture of the dish.
  5. Using a pestle and mortar grind the salt, the remaining peppercorns, the garlic and the scotch bonnet peppers together until a fine paste. Add this paste to the sliced onion in the bowl.
  6. Extract all the juice from the 4 limes and add it to the bowl.
  7. Chop one of the cucumbers, keeping all the juice and add to the mix in the bowl.
  8. Now comes a messy (but enjoyable) part. Using gloved hands (because of the chillies) squeeze together the mixture as tight as you can. This has the effect of pickling the onions with the lime juice so removing the strong raw onion flavour, and releases all the cucumber juice which is a major factor in the overall flavour of this dish. If you don’t do this part, your dish will not be the same.
  9. Once the trotters have finished cooking, rinse under cold water and when cool remove all the bones, chop the meat into small pieces and add to the bowl.
  10. Finely slice the second cucumber and add the slices to the mix.
  11. Cover the entire mixture with cold bottled water or water that has been de-chlorinated; stir well.
  12. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours.

Tip

Adjust the peppers to your taste. Two crushed Scotch Bonnet peppers will make it nice and hot!

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)

Reviews in English (1)

What a wonderful recipe!Thanks so much for this details description too as it has made the making of it really simple. A great dish if you like West Indian cooking!-14 Mar 2013


Pudding and Souse

Pudding and Souse is a traditional Saturday lunch for many Bajans. The souse is essentially pickled pork and the "pudding" is steamed sweet potato.

Traditionally souse was made using the pig trotters (feet), ear, snout and tongue. Today, many people prefer to use lean pork meat instead. The pudding is traditionally served in a casing of pig intestines (similar to sausages) but this is optional.

Every Bajan has their favourite dining spot to enjoy this delicacy, or has a "pudding and souse lady" from whom they order on a weekly basis. One of our favourite spots is the Village Bar at Lemon Arbour.


Ingredients of Souse

  • ½ pigs head
  • 2 trotters, also known as pettitoes – the feet of pigs
  • Juice of 4 limes
  • 2 teaspoon salt, to taste
  • 2 cucumbers, sliced
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 green pepper, sliced

Preparation

  1. Wash the trotter and the pig head thoroughly with lime.
  2. Place the trotter and the pig head in a pot. Add water and salt. Cook until soft and tender, about 1 hour and 30 minutes. Allow to cool. Skim off any residue and discard.
  3. Slice the pig or cut into pieces.
  4. Slice the green peppers and cucumbers.
  5. Chop the onions.
  1. Mix all the ingredients with some of the pig stock.
  2. Add the pork slices or pieces. Allow to set for a while.
  3. For best results, allow the mixture to chill in the fridge for a couple hours. This allows the flavors to meld and fuse together.
  1. Great additions to this recipe for souse include 2 tablespoon shado beni (or cilantro), 1 scotch bonnet pepper (without seeds) 1 scallion and a pinch of freshly ground black pepper.
  2. For less work in the kitchen, ask your butcher to clean and trim the pig feet for you.
  3. Pressure cooker method: Cook the pig’s trotter and the pig head for 15 minutes in a pressure cooker. Slightly cool then skim off any residue and discard. Add the remaining ingredients and cook until tender.

Best Cookware to Use

This is a great video on how to make Souse. Its not filmed in our kitchen but definitely worth watching. Please let us know how you made your own Souse variation after reading this guide


Souse

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Souse is a variety of head cheese found in Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. Head cheese is not a dairy product but rather a product made from (tah dah…) the head of an animal (usually pig or calf) along with some other left-over “scraps” that remain after butchering and often include the feet, tongue, and heart.

In a frugal household or in peasant cultures, no part of an animal that can be used is left go to waste. Pa Dutch and Coal Region favorites such as Pennsylvania Scrapple make use of “everything but the oink”. Head cheese itself, however, is not specific to the PA Dutch culture, but rather can be found in various cuisines across the US and globe including Caribbean and Eastern European.

The word souse itself probably comes from the Germanic souce, or pickling juice, which is related to sulza, or brine. Think of souse as head cheese with vinegar added. The traditional way to make head cheese is to simmer an animal’s head, which is very bone dense, for several hours which will then yield the bounty of rich gelatin needed to produce headcheese/souse. This gelatinous broth binds the meat together to form a terrine-like product usually in the shape of a loaf.

These days, if you find yourself without the source of a pig’s head because, well, say you gave up butchering your own animals when you took that IT job and moved to the heart of San Francisco, there’s good news. You can use some other parts to make this version of souse, like pigs feet. In fact, when made that way, some people refer to this dish as “pickled pigs’ feet”. You will find my recipe for actual “Pickled Pigs Feet”, HERE.

A good butcher shop or farmers’ market (plentiful in Pennsylvania Dutch country or The Coal Region) will often provide you with a source for the un-smoked pig’s feet. Some grocery stores with their own butcher on staff may also be able to get them for you.

This may not be a recipe you can make from items you normally find at the corner store in many places, but this page is dedicated to presenting authentic recipes for the foods we know and eat in the Coal Region and in Pa Dutch households, so I present it to you from my Coalcracker Kitchen.

(Many deli meat producers in the northeast Pennsylvania region make souse or head cheese commercially and you can try it that way from the supermarket deli. Distribution may vary widely, so calling your local market first is always a good idea.

Head cheese and souse are typically served cold or at room temperature. If in loaf form, they are sliced and served, as with cold cuts, on a sandwich or as an appetizer along with cheese and crackers.


Pig Feet Souse

Pig Feet Souse is a rather alarming name for a dish, but it is what it is… Pig feet soaked in a spicy, zesty and very tasty liquid.

For Caribbean people, Pig Feet Souse can be described as a rite of passage. Growing up, I enjoyed many a dish. It was often served at family parties. I remember being a kid, hoping my uncle would get tipsy so that he would demand my mother serve the souse!

This dish is superb after a bout of unbridled drinking, it puts you right back on track. It is usual to serve food at the beginning of a party to line stomachs, but instead Pig Feet Souse is reserved for a late night/early morning treat.

To prepare this dish, the pig feet is cooked in lots of water. Then drained and rinsed to get rid of the excess fat, and cut up into pieces. It is then stewed with cilantro and garlic. Finally, scallion, lime juice, vinegar and scotch bonnet is added. After allowing to sit for at least one hour the souse is served warm with cucumber slices and more scallion. It is delicious I tell you.

In early January 2017, my mother demonstrated how to make Pig Feet Souse, there were five of us in attendance and we were so pleased to learn from a master. I would’ve shown my face in the photo, but I looked terrible that day. The ladies in the pics are Tracy, my mother, Alex and Corrine. We are all one crazy family always having fun.

My mother will kill me if she finds out that her image is displayed on my blog for everyone to see. So shush – secret!

In the Caribbean, it is also tradition to eat souse on a Saturday afternoon. During more than one trip to Barbados, I have been a willing participant in following the “Souse Saturday” signs. If I managed to keep on track with the signs, I would end up at a small kiosk-like stall where a bowl of delicious Pig Feet Souse could be bought for a few dollars. Oh, what good times.

Now I know Pig Feet Souse is an acquired taste, but if you can get a taste for it, you’ll love this recipe.


Boiled Pigs Feet Recipe

  • 4 pigs feet split in half lengthwise
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 teaspoons crushed red pepper
  • barbecue sauce (optional to pour on after cooking)
  • water
  • 1 dutch oven or large boiling pot
  • 1 cutting board
  • 1 cutting board
  • 1 measuring spoons

As always the key to great cooking is to be prepared and to use quality ingredients. Okay, so where do you buy some pigs feet? Often times you will have to ask the grocery store butcher for the pigs feet because they're usually frozen and sometimes stored in the back of the store.

With pigs feet and the rest of the ingredients in hand you are now ready to start cooking.

  1. Begin by giving the pigs feet a good washing. For the purpose of presentation, remove any unsightly hair that you observe. Yes, pigs grow hair on the toes and feet just like humans. A disposable razor will remove the hair.
  2. Place all the ingredients in a large boiling pot and cover with water. Bring water to a boil over medium-high heat and then reduce heat to a simmer. Cover the pot with a lid and allow pigs feet to cook until tender, about 3 hours. While your meat is cooking stir constantly and skim away any foam that develops.

I included barbecue sauce as an ingredient for those of you who like to eat this delicious meat topped with bbq sauce.

This recipe provided courtesy of https://www.soulfoodandsoutherncooking.com/

I'm sure this pigs feet recipe will turn out to your liking. Serve this delectable meat with your favorite soul food sides, cornbread and southern beverage of choice. Enjoy your meal.


Guyanese Pork Souse Recipe

Guyanese pork souse is made with various parts of pig meat, cucumber, onions, pepper and lime juice.

• 1 lb. Trotters
• 1 lb. Face and Ears
• 1 lb. Pork Shoulder Steak
• 1 to 2 Small Cucumbers
• 4 oz. Onions
• 1 Large Pepper
• 5 large Lime Juice or 4 Large Lemon Juice
• ¼ pt. Vinegar
• 1 ½ pt. Water
• 2 tbsp. Chopped Celery
• 2 tbsp. Chopped Eschalot

Method
1. Carefully clean meat with some lime juice, removing any hairs, teeth and bits of bone.
2. Boil in lightly salted water until tender, but not broken up.
3. Place meat in a colander and run cold water over it to remove excess fat. Discard water in which meat has been boiled.
4. Allow to cool. Peel and slice cucumbers, onions and pepper.
5. Prepare marinade with lime or lemon juice, vinegar and about 1 ½ pints of water. Add salt to taste.
6. Arrange meat, onion, pepper, celery, eschalot, and cucumbers in layers in a deep dish, ending with a layer of cucumber sprinkled with rings of pepper, chopped eschalot and celery.
7. Pour over enough marinade to come up to topmost layer or cucumber.
8. Set aside at room temperature for at least 3 or 4 hours.

Note: Trotters and ears can be cooked in a pressure cooker until half done, before adding remainder of meat to simmer.


  • 4 pigs feet, split in half lengthwise
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • water
  • favorite barbecue sauce
  • 1 Dutch oven or large boiling pot
  • 1 slotted spoon
  • 1 baking pan
  • 1 cutting board
  • 1 measuring spoons

As always the key to great cooking is to be prepared and to use quality ingredients.

  1. Okay, so where do you buy pigs feet? Often times you will have to ask the grocery store butcher for the pigs feet because they're usually frozen and sometime stored in the back of the store.
  2. Begin by giving the pigs feet a good washing. For presentation purposes remove any unsightly hair that you observe. Yes pigs grow hair on the toes and feet just like humans. A disposable razor will remove the hair.
  3. Place all the ingredients in a large boiling pot and cover with water. Bring water to a boil over medium-high heat and then reduce heat to a simmer. Cover pot with lid and allow pigs feet to cook for about 2-1/2 hours. While your meat is cooking stir constantly and skim away any foam that develops.
  4. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees during the last 5 minutes of cooking your meat.
  5. Using a slotted spoon remove the pigs feet from the cooking juice. Try to keep the meat intact. Place the meat on a baking pan, in single layers with skin facing up. Also use the slotted spoon to remove some of the onions and spices from the cooking juice.
  6. Add the onions and spice to the top of the pigs feet and then apply a thick layer of your favorite barbecue sauce. Finally, place the pan in the oven and bake for about 40 minutes, until meat is tender.

This recipe provided courtesy of https://www.soulfoodandsoutherncooking.com/

I'm sure this barbecued pigs feet recipes will turn out to your liking. Serve this delectable meat with a side dish of collard greens, macaroni and cheese, corn bread and your southern beverage of choice. Enjoy your meal.


Cooking up some souse

Souse is often eaten as an appetizer before lunch or dinner, though really it can be enjoyed anytime. It’s also quick and easy to make. Here’s a recipe that we recently came across from St. Kitts.

  • 2 onions
  • 1 green pepper
  • ½ pigs head
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 cucumbers
  • 2 trotters
  • juice of 4 limes

Directions:
Wash trotters and head thoroughly with lime. Cook in salted water until tender about 1 ¼ hours. Let cool, then cut into pieces. Slice green pepper and cucumber and chop onion. Mix all ingredients with some of the stock. Add pork slices. Leave for a while. Serve with a tossed salad.

Prep time is only about 5-10 minutes, and you can have this all cooked and served-up in under two hours.


BLACK AND WHITE COOKIE RECIPE

Sweets are like this black and white cookie are popular in traditional German recipes.

  • 2 Cups flour
  • 1 Teaspoon baking powder
  • 2/3 Cup sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon vanilla
  • ¼ Teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 Egg
  • ½ Cup ground walnuts
  • 8 Tablespoons softened butter
  • 2 Tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 2 Tablespoons sugar

Combine flour, baking powder and 2/3 cup sugar in a bowl make a well in center.

Add to the well the egg, vanilla and almond add walnuts and butter and knead until smooth.

Divide dough in half to 1 half mix in cocoa and 2 tablespoons sugar.

Wrap separately and refrigerate both halves for 30 minutes.

Roll out BOTH halves into rectangles 11X13 inches place dark half on top of light one.

Starting at the 13 inch side, carefully roll up tightly (Like jelly roll).


Watch the video: Guyana Sweet Fish Box.