New recipes

15 Things You Didn’t Know About Guy Fieri

15 Things You Didn’t Know About Guy Fieri


You most likely know Guy Fieri as the host of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives on Food Network, singing the praises of blue-collar, honest grub, and as the chef behind Johnny Garlic’s, Tex Wasabi’s, and Times Square’s infamous Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar. But behind the spiky bleached-blond hair and backward sunglasses there’s an actual guy, and what we see on television is just one facet of him. Using some info from writer Allen Salkin’s book From Scratch: Inside the Food Network, we found 15 cool bits of information that you probably didn’t know about the King of Flavortown.

15 Things You Didn’t Know About Guy Fieri (Slideshow)

Fieri was actually born Guy Ferry, but changed it back to his old family name when he married his wife Lori in 1995, in order to honor his grandfather who changed it to Ferry when he immigrated from Italy. If you hear Guy say his own last name, he pronounces it almost like "Fieddi," rolling the "R" in what’s called an alveolar trill. In Italian, fieri translates more or less to "proud."

He never attended culinary school, but got his bachelor’s degree from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in Hospitality Management in 1990. While there, he was a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity.

After graduating, he took a job at a popular California restaurant chain (more on that later) before opening his first restaurant, Johnny Garlic’s, in Santa Rosa, Calif.

His star really took off after winning the second season of The Next Food Network Star, and today Fieri hosts a handful of TV shows, including the newest addition to his roster, Guy’s Grocery Games, which premiered on Oct. 27 on Food Network. He also owns seven locations of Johnny Garlic’s, Tex Wasabi’s in Santa Rosa (a second location in Sacramento closed down recently), and the infamous Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar in New York City's Times Square, which warranted one of the most scathing restaurant reviews ever written.

While other stars of Food Network come and go, Fieri’s star is burning as brightly as ever, as he maintains a reputation as one of those people that you either love or hate. Either way, you’ve got to admit that he’s a hard-working dude who’s carved out a major niche for himself in the American culinary scene.

And while you might think you know everything there is to know about Fieri, we bet that there’s plenty you don’t.


He’s always had a bit of an entrepreneurial bug: when Fieri was in fifth grade, he convinced the organizers of the Humboldt County Fair to allow him to sell balloons! Over the next six years he earned enough money to spend a year in France, by running a pretzel cart.


When Fieri was 16, he moved to Chantilly, France, for a year abroad, and was miserable for most of the time. He was given a tiny room to live in (the bathroom was two flights downstairs), and he couldn’t even use the phone without permission, because it was locked away.

This was originally published in November 2013.


How Fans Can Tell When Guy Fieri Doesn't Like The Food He's Eating

Renowned chef, author, and TV host, Guy Fieri is no stranger to the world of food. According to his official website, his love for food began early on in life when he was just ten years old. His first stint was selling pretzels from a homemade bicycle cart that he worked on with his dad. After hustling for years, Fieri was able to save enough cash to study in France where he explored his passion further and dipped his hands into the world of international cuisine.

The founder of several restaurants, Fieri also happens to be a well-known TV personality, working on many shows like Next Food Network Star, Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Guy's Grocery Games, and Guy's Big Bite. He's become such a recognizable star that ardent fans have begun to pick up on the chef's nuances. In fact, these fans are so well-acquainted with his on screen persona that they even know how to spot when he dislikes something he's eating.


7 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Guy Fieri

You most likely know Guy Fieri as the host of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives on Food Network, singing the praises of blue-collar, honest grub, and as the chef behind Johnny Garlic's, Tex Wasabi's, and Times Square's infamous Guy's American Kitchen & Bar. But behind the spiky bleached-blond hair and backward sunglasses there's an actual guy, and what we see on television is just one facet of him. Using some info from writer Allen Salkin's new book From Scratch: Inside the Food Network, we found 15 cool bits of information that you probably didn't know about the King of Flavortown.

Fieri was actually born Guy Ferry, but changed it back to his old family name when he married his wife Lori in 1995, in order to honor his grandfather who changed it to Ferry when he immigrated from Italy. If you hear Guy say his own last name, he pronounces it almost like "Fieddi," rolling the "R" in what's called an alveolar trill. In Italian, fieri translates more or less to "proud."

He never attended culinary school, but got his bachelor's degree from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in Hospitality Management in 1990. While there, he was a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity.


2. He knew he would be a chef when he was a young child

Guy Fieri was a somewhat remarkable child and he knew what kinds of foods he liked and what he didn’t. At the age of just 10 years, his insistence on having more meat than vegetables got him into a battle royale with his mother. Tired of his complaining, his mother suggested that if he didn’t like her cooking, he should do it himself. The precocious youth got on his bike and peddled his way to the nearby grocery store and charged some steaks to the family account, brought them home and prepared them for the family. His father commented that they were the best that he’d ever eaten in his life. This was the point in Guy’s life that he knew what he wanted to be when he grew up. At the age of 10, he knew he wanted to be a chef.


18 Guy Was Born With A Different Last Name

Famous men and women have often used different names than the ones they were born with for various reasons, some of which are usually related to their careers. However, it can be pretty strange to think about some of our most loved celebrities being born under a different name.

Even though Fieri did not do this for his career, he fits into this category. He was originally born under the name Guy Ramsey Ferry. He did this to honor his grandfather, who changed his surname to Ferry when he arrived in America from Italy. Fieri did this in 1995 when he married his wife.


10 things you didn't know about Guy Fieri

Guy Fieri is one of Food Network's stand out stars. He has multiple shows on the network and is perhaps best known for his signature bleach blonde locks. But what else is behind the mystique of the " Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives " host?

Here are 10 fun facts about Guy Fieri that you probably don't know.

His real name hasnt always been Guy Fieri.

That's right. Guy Fieri was actually born under the legal name Guy Ramsey Ferry , according to biography.com. Don't worry, though. It's not a sham. Fieri is actually his grandfather's given family name.

When his grandfather immigrated to the US from Italy, he changed the spelling to Ferry. As a nod to his grandfather, Guy changed his last name from Ferry to Fieri when he married his wife, Lori, in 1995.

He got his start on Food Networks "Food Network Star" show.

Guy Fieri has always been at home in the kitchen, but he worked his way up the celebrity ladder just like any other chef. He appeared on season two of the "Food Network Star" in 2006 and was crowned the winner .

He actually loves vegetables.

Although "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives" features a whole lot of meaty meals, Fieri is actually a huge fan of vegetables.

"I love fresh vegetables . Im a huge vegetable junkie. Thats one of the things people dont even know about me. Ill make six different types of vegetables for dinner," he told chef Robert Irvine.

Hes known for not liking eggs.

Paul Zimmerman /GettyImages

If you've spent any amount of time watching "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives," you probably already know that Guy Fieri is not a fan of eggs.

In a 2017 interview with the Tampa Bay Times , he told a reporter that he eats "eggs every once in a while." He's notorious for not eating eggs, however. So much so that when he visits a restaurant on Triple D, chefs will alter their recipes to avoid cooking eggs for Guy. "Hard-boiled and scrambled that's just not the way I like to party," he told the Times.

He started eating sushi when he was 8-years-old.

It seems like Guy Fieri was destined to have a refined palate. Per an interview with the Tampa Bay Times , he noted that he was eating sushi as a young kid. He attributes his adventurous taste buds to his parents, saying that, "My dad was the one who probably had the most influence on me cooking because he would always challenge me to try different things."

Guy Fieri thought up the idea of doing a kids cooking show before it was popular.

Frederick M. Brown/GettyImages

It turns out, Guy Fieri was a proponent of children's cooking shows before they were a thing.

He told Thrillist, "One of the biggest things is to see kids involved in cooking so much. When I got on [Food Network] 12 years ago, the first thing I said was, 'I want a kid's cooking show,' and they told me, 'Come on now,' I said, 'I am not kidding.' I have kids. I said, 'I'm telling you, kids love to cook.' I run into these people, fans of Triple D, and no one was really embracing that. Now look at major networks are doing it."

He loves cilantro.

Cilantro is one of those herbs that you either love or you hate. In fact, a 2012 study found that some people are predisposed not to like the green plant because it is built into their DNA. According to MSN , Guy Fieri, however, is a fan of cilantro.

He has plenty of recipes using the herb, including these instructions for a bowl of delicious Cilantro-Lime Slaw .

He was inducted into the Barbecue Hall of Fame.

In 2012, Guy Fieri has the distinct honor of being inducted into the Barbecue Hall of Fame . He's no stranger to barbecue greatness.

Guy Fieri and a team of pitmaster friends won the American Royal World Series of Barbecue Open Contest and the 2012 Houston Livestock & Rodeo World Championship Bar-B-Que Contest, according to the Barbecue Hall of Fame .

He moved to France as a teen for his culinary education.

By now, you've probably gathered that Guy Fieri is a dedicated chef. At the age of 16, he moved to Chantilly, France to enhance his kitchen skills, according to the Food Network .

He spent six years selling pretzels and washing dishes to save up for his trip to the international food mecca.

His hair is most likely brown.

Stephen Lovekin / Getty Images

By now, you've probably caught onto the fact that Guy Fieri's natural hair color isn't vibrant yellow. But do you know what color his hair actually is? From photos , it seems Fieri is actually a brunette once you take a peek underneath his frosted tips.


Fear and Loathing in Flavortown

Can’t travel because of the pandemic? You still have a passport to Flavortown. I ate my way through ‘Guy Fieri Food: Cookin’ It, Livin’ It, Lovin’ It’ — aka Guy Fieri’s cookbook — and lived to tell the tale.

Have you ever wanted to eat a SummerSlam main event? Have you ever thought, “Man, if only this monster truck rally was deep-fried, dipped in tequila and drizzled with donkey sauce, I would chow down”? Or: “I sure wish someone would pour rum and cinnamon on this pizza and set it on fire”?

Well, if so, I have good news: You would love Guy Fieri Food: Cookin’ It, Livin’ It, Lovin’ It , aka Guy Fieri’s cookbook.

It’s more than a cookbook, it’s like a dare yelled across a sports bar. It’s a collection of recipes filled with all kinds of fun new ways for you to play chicken with your GI tract. It’s a cookbook that spits while it talks, as it asks you if you want to go to Mexico tonight, but that you later find asleep in your front yard, spooning your neighbor’s dog. This cookbook likes to… use ellipses… to indicate… that it has suffered major brain damage… from how hard… it loves to party. It’s like learning to cook from a sentient… Wolf howl.

Okay, I know, I’m punching down. At the very least, I’m being no better than that infamous assessment of Fieri’s Time Square restaurant by New York Times food critic Pete Wells. In his blistering review, Wells addressed the man directly, “GUY FIERI, have you eaten at your new restaurant? Have you pulled up at one of the 500 seats at Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar and ordered a meal? Did you eat the food? Did it live up to your expectations? Did panic grip your soul as you stared into the whirling hypno wheel of the menu, where adjectives and nouns spin in a crazy vortex? When you saw the burger described as ‘Guy’s Pat LaFrieda custom blend, all-natural Creekstone Farm Black Angus beef patty, LTOP (lettuce, tomato, onion + pickle), SMC (super-melty-cheese) and a slathering of Donkey Sauce on garlic-buttered brioche,’ did your mind touch the void for a minute?”

that NYT review of Guy Fieri’s restaurant that entirely consists of questions https://t.co/4hew7AdEJW

&mdash Edgar Allen Ho (@jjdanek) April 30, 2020

The New York Times hasn't published a review this harsh since Guy Fieri's restaurant in Times Square and anyone who says they don't have even the tiniest bit of schadenfreude is lying.

&mdash Amy Spiro (@AmySpiro) February 23, 2020

T he thing is, it’s way too easy to make fun of Guy Fieri for being Guy Fieri. I certainly have no defense for myself. Other than to say that ridiculing his cuisine is reflexive at this point (so much so that even the fact that it’s both piling on and mean-spirited can’t stop it). But that’s a mistake. Because it overlooks what Fieri is — not as a chef, but as a human being. And honest to God, I feel very differently about Fieri the Man than I do Fieri the Chef. As someone who grew up in Northern California, it’s hard not to love the guy, if only for all the times he’s made heaps of hot food for bewildered survivors of our state’s ever-increasing wildfires. Guy Fieri is legit good people .

And so, I decided to challenge my assumptions. Or more accurately, the pandemic and its attendant quarantine — as well as the latest round of those aforementioned wildfires — has kept me inside for a majority of the last seven months, with very little to do. But while everyone else was busy baking bread and posting pics of their gnarled, knobby creations to their feed, I thought to myself, “Why be Instagram basic when I could learn how to shove a beer can deep inside the cavity of a chicken, wrap that bird completely in bacon and then roast it in a Dutch oven?”

Why not, in other words, see if Guy Fieri Food: Cookin’ It, Livin’ It, Lovin’ It could help me both better pass the time and truly understand Fieri’s culinary madness?

Which is how my girlfriend and I ended up pairing two Fieri main courses with either a Fieri cocktail or a Fieri dessert a couple nights a week throughout the month of July.

We did, however, set a few ground rules:

  1. No Pork. I don’t dig on swine, and swine has no interest in being part of my whole deal either.
  2. Stick to the Barnyard and Common Seafood. This rule was mostly to give Guy Fieri Food: Cookin’ It, Livin’ It, Lovin’ It a fighting chance, as it would be harder to judge what Fieri had done to, say, an oyster than to chicken (perhaps it was a bad oyster, etc.).
  3. Don’t Be Funny About It. Since so much of the cookbook seemed like a stunt performed with food, we tried to find things we’d actually order and dishes we were curious to see how they got Guy ’d.

To that last point, it was important that we actually wanted to spend the evening in Flavortown. Otherwise, it would just be a futile exercise in more of the same, which wasn’t gonna leave a good taste in anyone’s mouth.

Week One, Meal One

Appetizer: Buffalo Balls

Fieri on His Buffalo Balls: “Through my affiliation with Nabisco, I was asked to make some original recipes using Ritz Crackers for the Super Bowl. I didn’t want to go with the usual idea of what you can do with cheese and crackers — I had to go big [emphasis Fieri’s]. Now one of my favorite tailgate foods is Buffalo wings… question was, how to combine them? Ahaaa… this is my solution.” (I warned you about the ellipses.)

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? It was a co-sponsored shame. Guy’s Buffalo Balls are very, very, very sweet, which seems to be a product of the thick coating of crushed Ritz Crackers that Fieri uses to bread his balls. The Ritz Crackers also give the Buffalo Balls an odd, almost chemical flavor. I definitely wouldn’t recommend Guy Fieri’s balls to anyone (again, my apologies, it just can’t be helped).

Meanwhile, Fieri’s party cocktail, the Sea Donkey, tastes just as aquamarine blue as it looks. It’s a drink that doesn’t just lower inhibitions, it removes all feelings of responsibility and accountability. Like, I took one sip of the Sea Donkey and discovered that I’d somehow posted a selfie of me and a Dwayne Johnson look-alike at a pool party in Vegas.

The Irish Nachos are technically nachos. And while the idea was inspired — loading waffle-cut French fries with cheese, corned beef and green onions — it becomes far more about the nacho part of the equation than it is about what the Irish bring to it (i.e., he leans heavy on the cheese and reduces the chips portion to a potato-y afterthought).

Appetizer: Ridiculously Good Radicchio Bundles

Entree: Weird Spaghetti

Dessert: Peach and Blueberry Pizza

Fieri on the Inspiration for His Weird Spaghetti: “Looks like an old school Bolognese pasta, but you can’t judge a book by its cover [again, emphasis Fieri’s]. This one is closer to Cincinnati spaghetti. And for a lot folks outside of Cincinnati, that’s ‘weird spaghetti.’”

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? It would be mean to call the Weird Spaghetti a shame. But remember in elementary school when you’d paint with watercolors, and how if you used yellow, and then blue and red and orange and green, eventually it would just turn into a brown mush? That’s the effect Fieri achieves with spices (the number of spices in the Weird Spaghetti alone — eight). They’re all sort of piled atop one another, higgledy-piggledy, so that the effect is layers of flavor that ultimately negate each other, rather than distinguish themselves.

On the plus side, his Ridiculously Good Radicchio Bundles are pretty good. With this recipe, though, he mostly stays out of the way. The ingredients are commonly combined and not unexpected. There’s eight fresh basil leaves, eight fresh mozzarella balls, eight thin slices of prosciutto, a teaspoon of cracked black pepper, a half cup of pesto, three tablespoons of olive oil and a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar. It’s pretty hard to fuck that up.

The Peach and Blueberry Pizza wasn’t a big hit in the house, but it wasn’t offensive either. The trouble was the crust. As Fieri points out, “ You don’t build a $10 million mansion on a weak foundation [as always, emphasis his], and the same goes for your pizza.”

But what he ignores is that there’s also the opposite issue to consider — when you construct a crust for your pizza, you don’t want to make it so sturdy that you could actually use it as a foundation for a new home. That’s the case here, as the crust is about as heavy as unleavened bread.

Week Two, Meal Three

Entree: Red Rocker Margarita Chicken Sandwich

Side: Long Beach Coleslaw

Cocktail: The Grape Ape Bowla

Fieri on the Red Rocker Margarita Chicken Sandwich’s Namesake:I’m a rocker, so of course I’m a Sammy Hagar fan [same drill here — emphasis his]. The ‘Red Rocker’ is the Man, and boy, does he enjoy good food [last time, because I’m sure you’ve got it by now — emphasis Fieri’s]. As a restaurateur in Northern California, I found the chance to meet him a couple of times over the years, and he was always so cool, totally the real deal.

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? Neither? The margarita chicken sandwich tastes like something that gets added to a menu on Bar Rescue . You can order this exact sandwich on just about any cruise ship, or in any Vegas casino, or in any major business park in the U.S. It’s basically a grilled chicken sandwich with sliced red peppers. Red Rockin’!

The Long Beach Coleslaw also feels pretty generic. It’s a coleslaw, but instead of cabbage, Fieri has substituted iceberg lettuce, and there’s a blue cheese dressing involved. What does it taste like? Try to imagine an iceberg lettuce salad you’d get in Nebraska, but you call it a coleslaw and say it’s from Long Beach. Boom! It’s like you’re having dinner overlooking the Pacific now! That’s classy… on a budget, too!

The real shame here is the Grape Ape Bowla, which has the same vibe as a tasteless comment at a tailgate party that everyone ignores (like, say, a casually racist Ebola joke served up as a cocktail). I should note that we didn’t have the recommended fishbowl to serve it in, so we went with Fieri’s other suggestion instead — a large mixing bowl. But regardless of its container or presentation, it’s still the sort of drink that should come with a U.N. legal observer, with four different liquors (vodka, rum, gin and triple sec) that despite Fieri’s efforts, will never get along.

Week Two, Meal Four

Entree: Morgan’s Veggie Patties

Dessert: Cherry Cobbler Pizza

Fieri on Why He’s Been Known to Go Vegetarian: “A lot of the healthy dishes in my repertory have stemmed from cooking for my sister, Morgan (C.R. Bipim Delight is my nickname for her). She’s been vegetarian as long as I can remember, and I’m not a fan of just handing someone some steamed broccoli while I go eat turkey and all the fixins. So I’ve alway smade two or three unique veggie dishes that she can enjoy, and I don’t just do the traditional I put my Guy spin on it. But when my sister was diagnosed with melanoma, she was given a strict diet with an eclectic list of foods that she could eat to keep the pH of her body at the level she needed. I believe one of the greatest ways you can show love and respect for someone is to cook for them, so the first time I was to see Morgan after her diagnosis, I asked that she come to my house for dinner.”

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? Legit flames. The most rewarding aspect of Fieri’s cookbook are the glimpses you get into his personal story (like the one about his sister, who sadly died in 2011). It humanizes him beyond the frosted tips and bleached goatee. His cookbook is like if a memoir had some recipes. To this end, on Amazon, nearly all the reviews fail to mention the recipes. They gush not about the food, but how the cookbook is a great way to get to know Guy Fieri.

I agree. His recipes aren’t the reason why anyone should read this cookbook. Instead, you should read it for his choice anecdotes, like his arrival in New York to appear on the Food Network’s reality competition that launched his career, “I arrived in New York wearing a leather jacket, shorts and flip-flops, and stepped out of the cab into six inches of snow. I was the last one to get to the set — all the contestants were sitting in the common room, and they started running tape. Everybody had been to culinary school, and I said, ‘I own three restaurants and didn’t go to culinary school. I learned in restaurants. I don’t bake — I’m just Guy.’ I thought for sure I was dead.”

Long story short: He wasn’t dead. Far from it. He won.

As for his sister’s veggie patties, while preparing it, the meatless mash looked like a slurry of beans that wouldn’t hold together or form a coherent patty. It looked like we’d be trying to eat a bean salad between two buns. So it was a nice surprise to find that it formed a legit veggie burger patty, and even more surprisingly, it tasted like something you’d get from a pop-up restaurant, or a food truck at a festival where tie-dye is prominent. We did cheat a little and add a slice of provolone cheese it helped the flavor and the patties hold their shape. But a serious, no-joke shoutout to Fieri’s meatless gastronomy.

In terms of the rest of the meal, the Mambo Rice definitely went hard on one of Fieri’s favorite flavors — salt. And while the Cherry Cobbler Pizza sounds good, it was once again undone by the wheat crust. Like the Peach and Blueberry Pizza before it, the crust ended up being so heavy that it made the pizza taste more like a whole wheat bagel. The flavor of the cherry reduction used to dress the cobbler is legit good. But it ends up fighting against (and losing to) the crust.

Week Three, Meal Five

Entree: Chicken Lettuce Cups

Side: Szechuan Green Beans

Fieri on His Love of Chinese Food: “When I was going to college in Vegas, I used to stop in at a $5.99 Chinese restaurant by my apartment. A man named Mr. Lee was always there, and he’d always tell me to try the Hong Kong Noodles. But I’d get sidetracked and try all these other crazy things instead. Then one day he wasn’t there and I got worried, so I asked this kid behind the counter where he was. Turned out Mr. Lee wasn’t Mr. Lee — his name was Jerry — and he wasn’t Chinese, he was Hispanic.”

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? Total flames… if you enjoy a good salt lick. To that end, when you take your first bite of the Szechuan Green Beans, you can’t help but wonder: How did Guy Fieri make this salt taste like green beans? In fairness, he does get the Plum Sesame Sambal sauce right for the Chicken Lettuce Cups, making them more than sufficient.

Maybe I’d grown accustomed to Fieri’s mixology philosophy by this point, but the Shark Attack isn’t a bad tasting drink, per se. Like all of his drinks, though, it’s strong — and sweet. Like a diner waitress from a movie about an America that never really existed. It’s also another drink that calls for a menagerie of liquors (tequila, triple sec and rum) that would otherwise never spend time together.

Beware of this shark-infested booze, however. After having a second round of Shark Attacks, both my girlfriend and I woke up with brutal hangovers that lasted until sundown. It was so bad, my girlfriend slept in the living room. Why? Because I was violently tossing and turning all night. When I woke up, I had a headache in four places. She woke up sore all over. And sore at me.

Week Three, Meal Six

Entree: Big Bud’s Beer Can Chicken

Side: Goody Girl Champion Potatoes

Dessert: Coffee Bananas Foster

Fieri on His Close Encounter With a Cornfield as a Kid: “I can remember eating corn raw, right on the cob. When I first saw stalks of corn growing in a field I couldn’t believe it, thinking, Corn comes in a package? Oh my gosh! It grows on some kind of vending machine. But I still hold it in awe as a vegetable, because there are so many ways to use corn.”

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? More flames than not. Big Bud’s Beer Can Chicken involves draping the whole chicken in bacon. And yet, that promised signature trip to Flavortown never really arrives. Meanwhile, his Goody Girl Champion Potatoes come off essentially like a warm potato salad. And while — you guessed it — it’s very salty, it would be excellent at a picnic where people planned to get day-drunk. The best of the bunch — and of everything we’d eaten so far — was the Coffee Bananas Foster. Still, both my girlfriend and I were left wondering, “Why does Guy use so much nutmeg ?” Even when Fieri is at his finest, his choice of spices always seems to be based on the idea of “how can I punch you in the face with this flavor?”

Week Four, Meal Seven

Appetizer: Sangria-Glazed Shrimp

Entree: Tequila Turkey Fettuccine

Fieri on the Historic Nature of His Tequila Turkey Fettucine: “This is the dish that helped bring home the Next Food Network Star title. Think about a fettuccini alfredo in Mexico during Thanksgiving… Tequila!”

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? The name Turkey Tequila Fettuccine suggests something fun and irreverent. But it also highlights the real shtick at work in Fieri’s whole deal — you take a dish that’s generally enjoyed, you add tequila or rum (or both), drown it with those flavors, add more spices (but make sure it’s spices that no one would ever think of using together like cumin, chocolate and cinnamon) and then you name it after a city no one wants to visit, like, Indianapolis. More than anything else, these seem to be the directions to Flavortown. It’s the road map he uses to find radically new ways to make food taste like more of a dare than anything else.

In reality, though, the added tequila doesn’t act as a complicating flavor, at least not the kind that lends itself to the turkey or the fettuccine. As such, the resulting dish has the recognizable quality of the aftertaste of a tequila burp. It’s the same with his Sangria-Glazed Shrimp. The shrimp tastes fruity, but you don’t taste the sangria. Overall, when Fieri adds booze to his food, it merely feels like an alcoholic adding a cocktail or two to their afternoon.

Week Four, Meal Eight

Side: The “Big Dunkee” Pepper Jack and Horseradish Double-Baked Potato

Entree: Oak Town Garlic Vinegar Chicken

Cocktail: The “Big Dunkee”

Dessert: Tequila Lime Tart

Fieri on Being a Football Fan: “I’d always been a Houston Oilers fan, so upon arriving in Houston, I drove over to the Astrodome and asked, ‘Is this where the Oilers played? Is there a museum?’ And they said, ‘Of what?’ The Oilers had been moved to Tennessee, and there was nothing to see but the stadium. It wasn’t the first time that trip that I received a puzzled reaction…”

Was It Flames… or a Damn Shame? In Guy Fieri Food: Cookin’ It, Livin’ It, Lovin’ It , Fieri is quick to recommend foods you’d find in a parking lot. For instance, he writes, “Some of my favorite dishes came from football tailgate parties. This is a great one from an Oakland Raiders game. (Get it? Oak town!)” So we took him at his word that the Oak Town Vinegar Chicken was a perfect dish for tailgating. But this seems ridiculous based on how soupy it is. Plus, there’s the fact that it requires a dutch oven and a saucepan to prepare. It is, however, a damn fine entree for any homemade dinner. Also surprising my girlfriend and I, the pepper jack and horseradish potatoes are really good. They’re twice-baked and loaded with cheese and bacon. Better still, the horseradish flavor somehow doesn’t overwhelm the other flavors.

That said, when I ask my girlfriend about the “Big Dunkee,” she provides a one-word answer: “Medicinal.” She’s right, it tastes like something you’d serve to people if you were forced to make a cocktail out of whatever you could find under the sink in your parents’ bathroom. Then there was the Tequila Lime Tart. It was one of the better desserts, but there was no real reason to pour tequila on a tart, other than to say that you’d done it.

Without a doubt, though, Guy Fieri means well. He can’t help that he makes food fit for a Princess cruise ship or Disney buffet line. That’s his “has anyone thought of frying this?” energy, and he shouldn’t be blamed for it — because it’s honest and true (if misbegotten and artery-clogging). And when you’re trapped inside for almost seven months, there are far worse places to visit than an unapologetic tourist trap like Flavortown. You’d just want to make sure that you knew your way home.

Zaron Burnett III

Zaron Burnett is an investigative journalist and longform features writer based in Los Angeles. He covers culture, politics, race, and other perplexing mysteries for MEL.


26 things you didn't know about Guy Fieri

There's a lot to learn about Guy Fieri, including his real name and his hatred of eggs.

He's been inducted into the Barbecue Hall of Fame, and he has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Fieri once said he thought up the idea of doing a kid's cooking show before it was popular.

His name hasn't always been Guy Fieri.

He was actually born under the legal name Guy Ramsey Ferry, according to Biography.com.

But he didn't just make the name up — Fieri is actually his grandfather's given family surname.

When his grandfather immigrated to the US from Italy, he changed the spelling to Ferry. As a nod to his grandfather, Guy changed his last name from Ferry to Fieri when he married his wife, Lori, in 1995.

Before Fieri made it big on Food Network, he had a different kind of TV job.

In 2001, five years before Fieri won "Food Network Star," he was working for a company called Flowmaster that specialized in mufflers and other car parts.

He was featured on a couple of commercials for the brand, but he's a more subdued version of the TV personality we know today.

He got his start on Food Network's "Food Network Star."

Fieri has always been at home in the kitchen, but he worked his way up the celebrity ladder just like any other chef.

He appeared on season two of the "Food Network Star" in 2006 and was crowned the winner.

He's known for not liking eggs.

If you've spent any amount of time watching "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives," you probably already know that Guy Fieri is not a fan of eggs.

In a 2017 interview with the Tampa Bay Times, he told a reporter that he eats "eggs every once in a while."

But he's so known for disliking the food that when he visits a restaurant on "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives," chefs will alter their recipes to avoid cooking eggs for Guy.

He started eating sushi when he was a kid.

Per a 2017 interview with the Tampa Bay Times, Fieri said that he was eating sushi as a young kid.

He attributes his adventurous taste buds to his parents, saying that, "My dad was the one who probably had the most influence on me cooking because he would always challenge me to try different things."

Guy Fieri said he thought up the idea of doing a kid's cooking show before it was popular.

Fieri said he was a proponent of children's cooking shows before they were a thing.

In 2017 he told Thrillist, "One of the biggest things is to see kids involved in cooking so much. When I got on [Food Network] 12 years ago, the first thing I said was, 'I want a kid's cooking show,' and they told me, 'Come on now,' I said, 'I am not kidding.'"

He continued, "I have kids. I said, 'I'm telling you, kids love to cook.' I run into these people, fans of 'Triple D,' and no one was really embracing that. Now look at major networks are doing it."

In 2012, he was inducted into the Barbecue Hall of Fame.

And he's no stranger to barbecue greatness — he and a team of pitmaster friends won the American Royal World Series of Barbecue Open Contest and the 2012 Houston Livestock & Rodeo World Championship Bar-B-Que Contest, according to the Barbecue Hall of Fame.

He owns peacocks and goats.

In a December 2020 profile with Vulture, Fieri talked about owning peacocks to "help keep the rattlesnake population down."

At his California ranch, Fieri also has a large goat shed — he said the animals are smart and useful.

When he was in the sixth grade, Fieri's opened a lucrative mobile pretzel cart.

Today, the chef owns restaurants across the globe, but he opened his very first culinary operation when he was just 10 years old.

In 2020, Fieri told The Sporkful podcast that after a family vacation to Tahoe, he fell in love with soft pretzels. So when he returned home, he and his dad built a pretzel cart that he could mount to his bike.

The 10-year-old entrepreneur would ride around with The Awesome Pretzel Cart, selling the snack for .50 at fairs and events. And he eventually used those profits to fund his studies in France.

He moved to France as a teen for his culinary education.

At the age of 16, Fieri moved to Chantilly, France, to enhance his kitchen skills, according to the Food Network.

He spent six years selling pretzels and washing dishes to save up for his trip to the international food mecca.

His hair is most likely brown.

By now, you've probably caught onto the fact that Fieri's natural hair color isn't vibrant yellow.

Based on photos, it seems Fieri is actually a brunette once you take a peek underneath his frosted tips.

When he was a child, Fieri was seriously injured by a horse.

In 2015, the chef told GQ that he has a scar on his stomach from when he was 10 years old — a horse bucked him off and stomped on him.

The impact damaged his liver and heart and he had to get emergency surgery.

"I was f---ed up," he told the publication. "My mom was devastated."

He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In May 2019, Fieri became the third chef to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, joining the likes of Bobby Flay and Wolfgang Puck.

At Fieri's Walk of Fame Ceremony, actor Matthew McConaughey, who is reportedly a long-time friend of the chef, gave a special speech.

The celebrity chef has released six cookbooks.

In 2008, when "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives" really started taking off, Fieri released his first cookbook, "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives: An All-American Road Trip . . . With Recipes!"

Since then, he's released two more based on the show: "More Diners, Drive-ins and Dives" and "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown."

He has his own Northern California winery named after his sons.

Some celebrities have wine labels, but when Fieri wanted to get in on the action, he bought a whole 5-acre vineyard.

"This isn't juice that somebody else made that we just put in a bottle and put my name on it, which a lot of people do," he told GQ in 2015.

Hunt and Ryde Winery is named after his sons, Hunter and Ryder Fieri, and the bottles range in price from around $16.99 to $100.

The chef inspired Melissa McCarthy's character in "Bridesmaids."

In 2011, Melissa McCarthy told Conan O'Brien that her character in the hit comedy was based on the Food Network star.

"Really, when I first read it, the first person that I thought of was Guy Fieri from the Food Network," she said on the late-night show, per Vulture. "… I tried for a long time to convince them to let me wear short, white, spiky hair, and they were like, 'You can't actually be Guy Fieri.'"

Fieri first met his wife after firing her friend from his restaurant.

The chef first met his wife, Lori Brisson, when he was running a restaurant in Long Beach, California. But they didn't meet under the best conditions.

Her friend had recently been fired from his restaurant, and when she showed up soon after, Fieri told her she shouldn't be there.

"I was talking to her friend and saying 'Hey, listen, wait a few weeks before you come in,' and standing behind her is this blue-eyed, blonde girl giving me this mean mug," he told Delish in 2017.

But Lori put up a fight, and the chef ultimately let them stay — in part because he wanted to get to know her.

"I knew as soon as I saw her," he said. "I just knew."

Fieri officiated 101 same-sex marriages in one day.

When Florida lifted the ban on same-sex marriage in January 2015, Fieri started planning an extravagant celebration during which he would officiate a huge wedding ceremony.

He and chef Art Smith invited 101 same-sex couples to join him for the free event in Miami, where they gathered other celebrity chefs, including Duff Goldman, to cater fried chicken, crab-stuffed avocados, and a seven-tiered wedding cake.

He reportedly did the event in honor of his late sister, according to USA Today.

He started the Restaurant Employee Relief Fund amid the coronavirus pandemic.

When the coronavirus pandemic started impacting restaurants across the US, Fieri didn't stand idly by. The chef created the Restaurant Employee Relief Fund, which has provided over 43,000 $500 grants to restaurant workers.

With the help of companies, organizations, and individual donors, Fieri raised $21.5 million to help keep the industry alive.

He also codirected and starred in a documentary that chronicled the restaurant industry in 2020.

"Restaurant Hustle 2020: All on the Line" premiered on December 27, 2020, and documented four restaurants across the US as they were forced to close or curtail operations amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The documentary focused on the innovative strategies the owners came up with to save their businesses, keep their workers employed, and serve their communities.

Fieri majored in hospitality management.

After spending six years studying the culinary arts in France, Fieri returned to the US and attended the University of Nevada Las Vegas.

There, the chef got his bachelor's degree in hospitality management.

Some of his tattoos hold significant meaning.

In 2012, Fieri told AOL the backstories behind a few of his iconic tattoos.

Among many others, he has separate ink of both Hunter and Ryder's initials, another featuring the eagle from the US presidential seal to commemorate the time he cooked at the White House, and one of Botticelli's "The Birth of Venus" in honor of his late sister, Morgan.

Fieri also expressed his love for ink in his cookbook "Guy Fieri Food: Cookin' It, Livin' It, Lovin' It," which is filled with tattoo art.

Fieri's favorite "dining town" is Chicago.

During a 2020 interview with New York magazine's Grub Street, the chef said that of all the cities across the world that he's dined in, his favorite is Chicago.

He said he enjoys the city's variety of food options as well as its neighborly spirit.

The foodie isn't a huge breakfast fan, and he only eats it about twice a month.

Although Fieri has tried his fair share of breakfast dishes at diners across America, the chef told Insider that he doesn't usually partake in the meal.

"I probably eat breakfast, maybe twice a month. I'm not a breakfast guy at all," he said.

But he added that when he does sit down for a big family breakfast, his "go-to" is grits.

"My mom is from North Carolina, so we grew up eating grits and ham, and red-eye gravy. And that's like this staple," the chef said.

Fieri also said he's a fan of yogurt and granola and "gnarly" fruit and vegetable juices with things like kale, beets, and spinach.

The chef said he grew up mostly vegetarian, and that he's a "veggie machine."

Fieri may be known for his barbecue and comfort foods, but he hasn't always had such a carnivorous diet.

The chef told Insider that he actually grew up eating mostly vegetarian.

"We ate a lot of vegetarian — we were vegetarian — and I hated it," he said. "But of course what do you do? You go back to your childhood, and now I'm a veggie machine."

Now, he said there isn't a vegetable that he and his family don't love.

There's a petition to rename Fieri's hometown of Columbus, Ohio, to Flavortown - and the chef is honored.

In 2020 Tyler Woodbridge started a Change.org petition to rename Columbus, Ohio, to Flavortown, and he quickly racked up hundreds of thousands of signatures.

In the description of the petition, Woodbridge said his reasoning for the name change was twofold: to detach the city from Christopher Columbus and honor a Columbus native, and to highlight "Central Ohio's proud heritage as a culinary crossroads" in America.

When asked what he thought of the petition, Fieri told Insider, "The residents of Flavortown definitely have some power, you know, they definitely are a motley crew. And I, of course, was honored."

But he continued, "There are so many amazing people in this country that would so much more deserve having something named after them than me or Flavortown."

Read the original article on Insider

'Life-altering:' As millions cope with smell loss from COVID-19, researchers find new explanations and possible treatments

Smell loss afflicts the majority of those with COVID-19. A new understanding is emerging about what causes it, and eventually, how it might be treated.

TikTokers wished a 97-year-old Auschwitz survivor a 'happy Holocaust' as some ɿree Palestine' supporters target Jewish social media users with antisemitic abuse

Following Israel's bombing campaign on Gaza, Jewish creators' social media content was often spammed with antisemitic comments.

AdPlace A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

Brilliant Car Cleaning Hacks Local Dealers Wish You Didn’t Know

Column: Why McCarthy and McConnell want you to forget about the Jan. 6 riot

A serious investigation of the Capitol riot is the right thing to do. But it could turn into a nationally televised embarrassment for the GOP.

Despite criticism, Marjorie Taylor Greene says she still stands behind her Holocaust statement

"No one should be treated like a second-class citizen for saying 'I don't need to wear a mask,' . so I stand by all of my statements," Greene said.

Ted Cruz reacts to 'Kremlin Cruz' nickname given to him by MSNBC anchor Brian Williams after the Texas senator shared Russian army propaganda

Brian Williams named the GOP senator "Kremlin Cruz" after noting that he hated being called "Cancun Cruz" when he fled Texas during a storm.

'She had to hold her little boy as he died': 6-year-old's family, California police seeking shooter in road rage death

The boy, identified by family as Aiden Leos, was in the backseat of his mother's car when another driver shot and killed him, authorities said.

Ousted GOP Chairwoman Liz Cheney calls Marjorie Taylor Greene's statement comparing mask mandates to the Holocaust ɾvil lunacy'

In an interview on Thursday, Greene also called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi "mentally ill' for enforcing a mask mandate.

Simone Biles nailed a vault so dangerous that no woman had ever tried it in competition before her

Simone Biles became the first woman to attempt - or complete - a Yurchenko double pike during competition at the US Classic Saturday night.

Georgia judge approves ballot audit as Trump supporters continue to push unfounded election claims

Judge permits recount in county with no evidence of absentee ballot fraud, fuelling former president’s claims

Former Trump advisor Michael Flynn says coronavirus a conspiracy to distract from election

Former three star General is a vocal supporter of QAnon conspiracy theories

If Donald Trump faces criminal charges, few think it will hurt him with his base in 2024

Criminal charges would create political problems for Trump, but would not necessarily prevent him from campaigning in 2022 and running in 2024.

Are Senate Republicans trying to ɽrive a wedge' between Biden and his staff during infrastructure negotiations?

Senate Republicans are "trying to drive a wedge" between President Biden and his staff during negotiations over the White House's infrastructure proposal, political analyst Bill Scher argues, citing an email to the press from Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.V.). Capito is leading the Republican effort to get Biden to cut down on his plan, which initially cost $2.25 trillion, but, as of Friday, sits at $1.7 trillion. Shrinking the total appeared to be a gesture of compromise, but it wasn't well-received by the GOP, and Capito's office took aim at Biden's advisers, stating that the two sides have been growing further apart since they got involved. White House staff, meanwhile, insist they, just like Biden, genuinely want to reach across the aisle, Politico reports. This, from Capito’s office, should be parsed closely: “Based on today’s meeting, the groups seem further apart after two meetings with White House staff than they were after one meeting with President Biden.” Capito is trying to drive a wedge between Biden and his staff — Bill Scher (@billscher) May 22, 2021 If Scher's reading of Capito's statement is accurate, there so far doesn't seem to be any inkling that the strategy is working. Read more at Politico. More stories from theweek.comAngelina Jolie stands perfectly still, unshowered, covered in bees for World Bee DayWhy Emily Wilder got fired and Chris Cuomo didn't5 riotously funny cartoons about GOP resistance to the January 6 Commission

UK able to count how many people enter and leave the country for the first time, Home Office plans reveal

The UK will be able to count how many people enter and leave the country for the first time in plans revealed on Sunday by the Home Office. The new digital system will mean that the Government can now accurately measure levels of immigration. The system will also be able to check whether people have permission to enter the country, meaning that the Home Office and border officials can crack down on foreign criminals entering the UK. Those wishing to come to the UK without a visa or immigration status will have to apply for an American-style Electronic Travel Authorisation (ETA), around 30 million of which are expected to be processed each year. Migration estimates in the UK have been inaccurate for decades, with the number of Europeans living in the country going underestimated by millions. It was estimated that 3 million people from the continent lived in the UK, but as of last month there have been more than 5.4 million applications from Europeans for settled status. It comes after senior Tory MPs raised questions about the quality of Government data on migrants in Britain, which affects public services plans to meet demand. Last week John Hayes,a former Conservative security minister, said: “It’s really clear that taking back control of our borders means knowing who is coming and going.” The new “fully digital” reforms to the immigation system are expected to be completed by the end of 2025. Priti Patel, the Home Secretary, said: “Now we have taken back control and ended free movement, security is at the very heart of our immigration strategy. “Our new fully digital border will provide the ability to count people in and out of the country, giving us control over who comes to the UK. “Our new approach will make it easier to identify potential threats before they reach the border. The British people will have confidence that the strongest controls are in place to keep them safe.”

As COVID-19 cases and deaths spike in India, ɺ sense of alarm and horror' in US

As India experiences a spike in COVID-19 cases and deaths, Indian residents in the U.S. are looking for ways to help family and friends overseas.

Clippers, betrayed by their biggest strength, lose Game 1 to Mavericks

Luka Doncic had a triple-double and Dallas Mavericks role players outperformed the Clippers late to win Game 1 of the first-round series 113-103.

Thrill is gone: Los Angeles skyscraper slide won't reopen

A renovation will do away with a slide that gave thrill-seekers a brief ride on the outside of a downtown Los Angeles skyscraper. The new owner of the U.S. Bank Tower will remove the Skyslide and Skyspace public observation deck, the Los Angeles Times reported Friday. Developer Silverstein Properties bought the U.S. Bank Tower last year for $430 million and plans to spend $60 million on upgrades to make it more appealing to businesses in creative fields, the Times reported.

Ashton Kutcher's twin brother was 'very angry' when actor revealed he had cerebral palsy

Ashton Kutcher revealed his twin brother's cerebral palsy diagnosis on national TV during a 2003 interview.

Father sues after Illinois police mistake his daughter’s ashes for drugs

Dartavius Barnes is suing the city of Springfield and the Springfield Police Department for what he says is the desecration of his 2-year-old daughter’s cremated ashes during a warrantless search. A man is suing the city of Springfield, Illinois and the Springfield Police Department for what he says was the “desecration” of his child’s ashes. In April 2020, Dartavius Barnes was pulled over by Springfield police for speeding and was placed in a squad car while officers commenced searching his vehicle for drugs.


Things you didn’t know about Guy Fieri

You most likely know Guy Fieri as the host of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives on Food Network, singing the praises of blue-collar, honest grub, and as the chef behind Johnny Garlic’s, Tex Wasabi’s, and Times Square’s infamous Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar.

But behind the spiky bleached-blond hair and backward sunglasses there’s an actual guy, and what we see on television is just one facet of him. Using some info from writer Allen Salkin’s new book From Scratch: Inside the Food Network, we found some cool bits of information that you probably didn’t know about the King of Flavortown.

Fieri was actually born Guy Ferry, but changed it back to his old family name when he married his wife Lori in 1995, in order to honor his grandfather who changed it to Ferry when he immigrated from Italy. If you hear Guy say his own last name, he pronounces it almost like "Fieddi," rolling the "R" in what’s called an alveolar trill. In Italian, fieri translates more or less to "proud."

He never attended culinary school, but got his bachelor’s degree from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in Hospitality Management in 1990. While there, he was a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity.

After graduating, he took a job at a popular California restaurant chain (more on that later) before opening his first restaurant, Johnny Garlic’s, in Santa Rosa, Calif.

His star really took off after winning the second season of The Next Food Network Star, and today, Fieri hosts a handful of TV shows, including the newest addition to his roster, Guy’s Grocery Games, which premiered on Oct. 27 on Food Network. He also owns seven locations of Johnny Garlic’s, Tex Wasabi’s in Santa Rosa (a second location in Sacramento closed down recently), and the infamous Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar in New York City's Times Square, which warranted one of the most scathing restaurant reviews ever written.

While other stars of Food Network come and go, Fieri’s star is burning as brightly as ever, as he maintains a reputation as one of those people that you either love or hate. Either way, you’ve got to admit that he’s a hard-working dude who’s carved out a major niche for himself in the American culinary scene.

And while you might think you know everything there is to know about Fieri, we bet that there’s plenty you don’t.


9 Things You Didn’t Know About Guy Fieri’s ‘Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives’

This new website is very sluggish on my laptop. I keep getting a message that says "slow running script" and "Mozilla not responding". What 's up?

No one cares about your boring, inane listicle posts, toots. Move it the fuck along.

I get so hungry watching all the good food that gets cooked on that show, and I have learned so many interesting techniques and tricks to cooking.

Guy's a douche, but I appreciate his "enthusiasm."

Some may think he's over-the-top, but he has his funny moments, and he really has a thing for impersonating Arnold Schwarzenegger, doesn't he?

I'd rather have a host like Guy, who makes the show energetic and fun, than watching a boring ass talking head like Alton Brown or Giada.

The only things I watch on Food Network are Triple D, Ina Garten, and Chopped.

Guy is a dick, but once you get past that, it's a lot of fun to see how these places make their food.

I like shows where the people hosting look like they actually EAT the food!! But in general I haven't really watched Food Network for about 10 years (I did really like Sweet Genius a few years ago, but they cancelled it). I'm from the Frugal Gourmet, Julia Child PBS generation so I've been watching cooking shows for decades it's gotten to the point where there's nothing new left to learn.

Guy is a horrible homophobe and literal human garbage.

[quote]I did really like Sweet Genius a few years ago

OMG, the guy who was the host of that was the biggest asshole I've ever seen on TV! I detest Guy Fieri, but that guy was FAR worse.

Guy's PR man is on line 2, R6.

I wouldn't call the Sweet Genius guy an asshole.

He was just very eccentric, bordering on campy.

R9 is right. He's an openly gay baker who plays it up for the camera.

Has anyone been to Bop-n-Grill in Chicago? Damn, that umami burger looks good.

Another place that looks tasty is that roadkill bbq in Las Vegas.

DDD has so many awesome places I'd love to visit.

It's no wonder they have a DDD tour set up, to visit these local eateries. There are so many to choose from, and they all look so good!

Guy looks like he does big stinkies in the bathroom.

I thought I read here that his hairdresser is his bf. Or maybe was - since they were filmed having a huge fight.

Guy is repellant. But his underlings do make a decent burger, but that's about it. Everything else sucks big time. I really think I'd rather support other more talented cheftainers.

At least he doesn't parachute into in some bumfuck Third World country, pontificate about its depredations, eat its shitty food, and then expect a Nobel Prize for Peace.

The New York Times review of his Times Square restaurant should have won the Pulitzer.

The most interesting thing about fieri is the story of the kid who tried to steal fieri's lamborghini

Interesting read, and made through the clicking without dying of old age first.

I got violently ill from food poisoning at his Manhattan shit hole restaurant.


26 things you didn't know about Guy Fieri

He was actually born under the legal name Guy Ramsey Ferry , according to Biography.com.

But he didn't just make the name up — Fieri is actually his grandfather's given family surname.

When his grandfather immigrated to the US from Italy, he changed the spelling to Ferry. As a nod to his grandfather, Guy changed his last name from Ferry to Fieri when he married his wife, Lori, in 1995 .

In 2001, five years before Fieri won "Food Network Star," he was working for a company called Flowmaster that specialized in mufflers and other car parts.

He was featured on a couple of commercials for the brand , but he's a more subdued version of the TV personality we know today.

Fieri has always been at home in the kitchen, but he worked his way up the celebrity ladder just like any other chef.

He appeared on season two of the "Food Network Star" in 2006 and was crowned the winner .

He's known for not liking eggs.

Paul Zimmerman /GettyImages

If you've spent any amount of time watching "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives," you probably already know that Guy Fieri is not a fan of eggs.

In a 2017 interview with the Tampa Bay Times , he told a reporter that he eats "eggs every once in a while."

But he's so known for disliking the food that when he visits a restaurant on "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives," chefs will alter their recipes to avoid cooking eggs for Guy.

Per a 2017 interview with the Tampa Bay Times , Fieri said that he was eating sushi as a young kid.

He attributes his adventurous taste buds to his parents, saying that, "My dad was the one who probably had the most influence on me cooking because he would always challenge me to try different things."

Frederick M. Brown/GettyImages

Fieri said he was a proponent of children's cooking shows before they were a thing.

In 2017 he told Thrillist, "One of the biggest things is to see kids involved in cooking so much . When I got on [Food Network] 12 years ago, the first thing I said was, 'I want a kid's cooking show,' and they told me, ɼome on now,' I said, 'I am not kidding.'"

He continued, "I have kids. I said, 'I'm telling you, kids love to cook.' I run into these people, fans of 'Triple D,' and no one was really embracing that. Now look at major networks are doing it."

In 2012, he was inducted into the Barbecue Hall of Fame. Guy Fieri is a master when it comes to barbecuing.

And he's no stranger to barbecue greatness — he and a team of pitmaster friends won the American Royal World Series of Barbecue Open Contest and the 2012 Houston Livestock & Rodeo World Championship Bar-B-Que Contest, according to the Barbecue Hall of Fame .

He owns peacocks and goats. Guy Fieri has peacocks.

In a December 2020 profile with Vulture , Fieri talked about owning peacocks to "help keep the rattlesnake population down."

At his California ranch, Fieri also has a large goat shed — he said the animals are smart and useful.

When he was in the sixth grade, Fieri's opened a lucrative mobile pretzel cart. Guy Fieri ran the entire operation as a 10-year-old.

Philipp Guelland/Getty Images

Today, the chef owns restaurants across the globe, but he opened his very first culinary operation when he was just 10 years old.

In 2020, Fieri told The Sporkful podcast that after a family vacation to Tahoe, he fell in love with soft pretzels. So when he returned home, he and his dad built a pretzel cart that he could mount to his bike.

The 10-year-old entrepreneur would ride around with The Awesome Pretzel Cart, selling the snack for .50 at fairs and events. And he eventually used those profits to fund his studies in France.

He moved to France as a teen for his culinary education. Guy Fieri was trained as a chef in France.

At the age of 16, Fieri moved to Chantilly, France, to enhance his kitchen skills, according to the Food Network .

He spent six years selling pretzels and washing dishes to save up for his trip to the international food mecca.

His hair is most likely brown. He's hardly recognizable without his signature bleached-blonde hairdo.

Stephen Lovekin / Getty Images

By now, you've probably caught onto the fact that Fieri's natural hair color isn't vibrant yellow.

Based on photos , it seems Fieri is actually a brunette once you take a peek underneath his frosted tips.

When he was a child, Fieri was seriously injured by a horse. Guy Fieri had to get emergency surgery.

Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Discovery

In 2015, the chef told GQ that he has a scar on his stomach from when he was 10 years old — a horse bucked him off and stomped on him.

The impact damaged his liver and heart and he had to get emergency surgery .

"I was f---ed up," he told the publication. "My mom was devastated."

He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Guy Fieri got his star in 2019.

Paul Archuleta / Stringer/Getty

In May 2019, Fieri became the third chef to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame , joining the likes of Bobby Flay and Wolfgang Puck.

At Fieri's Walk of Fame Ceremony, actor Matthew McConaughey, who is reportedly a long-time friend of the chef, gave a special speech.

The celebrity chef has released six cookbooks. His first cookbooks were based on his Food Network show.

In 2008, when "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives" really started taking off, Fieri released his first cookbook, " Diners, Drive-ins and Dives: An All-American Road Trip . . . With Recipes!"

Since then, he's released two more based on the show: "More Diners, Drive-ins and Dives" and "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown."

He has his own Northern California winery named after his sons. Guy Fieri with his sons Hunter (left) and Ryder (right).

Some celebrities have wine labels , but when Fieri wanted to get in on the action, he bought a whole 5-acre vineyard.

"This isn't juice that somebody else made that we just put in a bottle and put my name on it, which a lot of people do," he told GQ in 2015 .

Hunt and Ryde Winery is named after his sons, Hunter and Ryder Fieri, and the bottles range in price from around $16.99 to $100.

The chef inspired Melissa McCarthy's character in "Bridesmaids." Melissa McCarthy starred in "Bridesmaids."

In 2011, Melissa McCarthy told Conan Oɻrien that her character in the hit comedy was based on the Food Network star.

"Really, when I first read it, the first person that I thought of was Guy Fieri from the Food Network," she said on the late-night show, per Vulture . "… I tried for a long time to convince them to let me wear short, white, spiky hair, and they were like, 'You can't actually be Guy Fieri.'"

Fieri first met his wife after firing her friend from his restaurant. Guy and Lori Fieri on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2019.

The chef first met his wife, Lori Brisson , when he was running a restaurant in Long Beach, California. But they didn't meet under the best conditions.

Her friend had recently been fired from his restaurant, and when she showed up soon after, Fieri told her she shouldn't be there.

"I was talking to her friend and saying 'Hey, listen, wait a few weeks before you come in,' and standing behind her is this blue-eyed, blonde girl giving me this mean mug," he told Delish in 2017 .

But Lori put up a fight, and the chef ultimately let them stay — in part because he wanted to get to know her.

"I knew as soon as I saw her," he said. "I just knew."

Fieri officiated 101 same-sex marriages in one day. Guy Fieri helped organize and run the 2015 event.

When Florida lifted the ban on same-sex marriage in January 2015, Fieri started planning an extravagant celebration during which he would officiate a huge wedding ceremony.

He and chef Art Smith invited 101 same-sex couples to join him for the free event in Miami, where they gathered other celebrity chefs, including Duff Goldman , to cater fried chicken, crab-stuffed avocados, and a seven-tiered wedding cake.

He reportedly did the event in honor of his late sister, according to USA Today .

He started the Restaurant Employee Relief Fund amid the coronavirus pandemic. Guy Fieri helped provide grants to restaurant workers in need.

Jeff Lewis/AP Images for The Players Tailgate

When the coronavirus pandemic started impacting restaurants across the US, Fieri didn't stand idly by. The chef created the Restaurant Employee Relief Fund , which has provided over 43,000 $500 grants to restaurant workers.

With the help of companies, organizations, and individual donors, Fieri raised $21.5 million to help keep the industry alive.

He also codirected and starred in a documentary that chronicled the restaurant industry in 2020. Guy Fieri led the project.

"Restaurant Hustle 2020: All on the Line" premiered on December 27, 2020, and documented four restaurants across the US as they were forced to close or curtail operations amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The documentary focused on the innovative strategies the owners came up with to save their businesses, keep their workers employed, and serve their communities.

Fieri majored in hospitality management. Guy Fieri attended college in Las Vegas.

After spending six years studying the culinary arts in France, Fieri returned to the US and attended the University of Nevada Las Vegas .

There, the chef got his bachelor's degree in hospitality management.

Some of his tattoos hold significant meaning. He has a rendition of "The Birth of Venus" in honor of his sister.

In 2012, Fieri told AOL the backstories behind a few of his iconic tattoos .

Among many others, he has separate ink of both Hunter and Ryder's initials, another featuring the eagle from the US presidential seal to commemorate the time he cooked at the White House, and one of Botticelli's "The Birth of Venus" in honor of his late sister, Morgan.

Fieri also expressed his love for ink in his cookbook "Guy Fieri Food: Cookin' It, Livin' It, Lovin' It," which is filled with tattoo art.

Fieri's favorite "dining town" is Chicago. Guy Fieri at Chicago's Vito and Nick's Pizzeria on "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives."

During a 2020 interview with New York magazine's Grub Street, the chef said that of all the cities across the world that he's dined in, his favorite is Chicago .

He said he enjoys the city's variety of food options as well as its neighborly spirit.

The foodie isn't a huge breakfast fan, and he only eats it about twice a month. When Guy Fieri does eat breakfast, it's usually grits, granola, or juice.

Although Fieri has tried his fair share of breakfast dishes at diners across America, the chef told Insider that he doesn't usually partake in the meal.

"I probably eat breakfast, maybe twice a month. I'm not a breakfast guy at all," he said.

But he added that when he does sit down for a big family breakfast, his "go-to" is grits.

"My mom is from North Carolina, so we grew up eating grits and ham, and red-eye gravy. And that's like this staple," the chef said.

Fieri also said he's a fan of yogurt and granola and "gnarly" fruit and vegetable juices with things like kale, beets, and spinach.

The chef said he grew up mostly vegetarian, and that he's a "veggie machine." Guy Fieri said that he and his family eat a lot of vegetables.

Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images

Fieri may be known for his barbecue and comfort foods, but he hasn't always had such a carnivorous diet.

The chef told Insider that he actually grew up eating mostly vegetarian.

"We ate a lot of vegetarian — we were vegetarian — and I hated it," he said. "But of course what do you do? You go back to your childhood, and now I'm a veggie machine."

Now, he said there isn't a vegetable that he and his family don't love.

There's a petition to rename Fieri's hometown of Columbus, Ohio, to Flavortown - and the chef is honored.

In 2020 Tyler Woodbridge started a Change.org petition to rename Columbus, Ohio, to Flavortown, and he quickly racked up hundreds of thousands of signatures .

In the description of the petition, Woodbridge said his reasoning for the name change was twofold: to detach the city from Christopher Columbus and honor a Columbus native, and to highlight "Central Ohio's proud heritage as a culinary crossroads" in America.

When asked what he thought of the petition, Fieri told Insider, "The residents of Flavortown definitely have some power, you know, they definitely are a motley crew. And I, of course, was honored."

But he continued, "There are so many amazing people in this country that would so much more deserve having something named after them than me or Flavortown."